Marine Debris Removed from Remote Hawaiian Islands

Monday, September 19, 2005
Members of the U.S. Coast Guard, NOAA, and the University of Hawaii's Sea Grant Program have just returned from a joint mission to remove thousands of pounds of deadly marine debris from the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The Coast Guard Cutter Walnut, a 225-ft. buoy tender home ported in Honolulu, departed on Aug. 22 for a 1,000 mile trip to the remote islands of Pearl and Hermes Atoll. Their goal was to remove as much lethal marine debris as possible. Walnut's crew removed 21,110 pounds of fishing net and other marine trash from more than 60 sites across the atoll using the ship's crane, lift bags, divers and just plain elbow grease. The Kukui, another 225-ft. Coast Guard cutter from Honolulu, joined the debris recovery effort on Sept. 7. The Kukui's crew first traveled to Maro Reef and has removed more than seven tons of trash on its travel back to Oahu. The Kukui will be returning to Coast Guard Integrated Support Command Honolulu on Monday to offload the debris. NOAA’s Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center's (PIFSC) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) provided technical support using geographical information systems to survey, locate, and provide expertise on removing marine debris. The NOAA representatives created daily survey plans, recommended navigation to the specified reefs and directed Coast Guard divers in debris surveys and data collection procedures. The vessel Freebird has been chartered by NOAA to resume debris removal efforts for September through November of this year, focusing their attention at French Frigate Shoals.

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter July 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

Canadian Authorities seek to contain oil spill moving down river

Authorities are building a new containment boom to fight an oil spill in a major western Canadian river, officials said on Saturday, after the spill breached a

Cosco: No to Shark Fin

China's biggest shipping and logistics company Cosco has pledged a total ban on transporting shark's fins,  says SCMP. It called the move a "body blow" to the international shark's fin trade.

Panama Canal Launches Green Award System

The Panama Canal has launched the Green Connection Award, a new initiative to recognize customers who demonstrate excellent environmental stewardship, and to encourage

LNG

LNG: Did the Greeks Get it Wrong?

In December 2013, Alibra’s market report front page read: “When in shipping, do as the Greeks do.” At that time, Alibra was referring to the fact that 31% of the

Ship of the Year Award for NYK Vessel

Japan's first LNG-fueled ship, Sakigake, which is a tugboat owned by NYK has been recognized with a Technology Special Award at the 2015 Ship of the Year Awards

First U.S. LNG shipment to cross expanded Panama Canal

The United States will ship its first liquefied natural gas (LNG) cargo through an expanded Panama Canal next week.   The waterway shaves distances between export

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0728 sec (14 req/sec)