Mexico Plans Huge Air, Rail And Sea Terminal

Monday, November 22, 1999
The Mexican state of Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico is planning to build a massive air, rail and sea cargo terminal for international trade, according to state officials. Veracruz officials are in talks with U.S. asset manager Alliance Capital and an international consortium that includes Mexican construction company Grupo Tribasa for the project, the first phase of which would cost $500 million. Working in conjunction with local authorities, the private companies would fund the investment in the major infrastructure project linking Veracruz's current air and sea ports with a new rail terminal.

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