New Diesel Science Center

Friday, March 18, 2005
MAN B&W Diesel A/S and Danish power supplier ENERGI E2 are entering into a joint venture to create Denmark’s new attraction in the world of diesel engines. This new diesel science centre will be located in the building where you will find the old diesel engine in the H. C. Ørsted Værket, one of Copenhagen’s major power plants, in the southern part of the city. It will become a very interesting venue for those interested in the history and development of the diesel engine. ENERGI E2’s mega B&W diesel engine from 1932, which remained the largest engine in the world for approximately 35 years, is still operational and raring to go. It will be the main exhibit of the centre, together with some of the first B&W engines from the start of the 20th century.

The 'double acting' cylinder principle used in this engine is different from today's large two-stroke diesel engines in only one main respect, power is generated by combustion in chambers at both the top and bottom of the cylinder. The exhibition centre will contain many and varied activities and interactive items, such as engine simulators and multimedia presentations. Construction will start in the late summer and will be finished in May 2006. When the new centre has been completed, MAN B&W Diesel will move its museum from its present location at Christianshavn to the new site at ENERGI E2’s H. C. Ørsted Værket.

This means that many of the impressive, highly detailed and moving models of diesel engines, will be transferred to the new facility. Also on show will be many, faithfully recreated scale models of the ships that were powered by the engines on view in the exhibition. One of the ship models on view will be the M/S Amerika.

This vessel was powered by a 'sister' engine to the one housed in the new centre. With six cylinders, each having a 62 cm diameter bore and a 140 cm stroke, this marine twostroke diesel engine was at the leading edge of ship design. This dynamic exhibition will give visitors the opportunity to discover the diesel engine universe:

• Experience the running and operation of a diesel engine

• Discover the major effect diesel engines have on society

• See the technical progress during the last 100 years

• Get an impression of the diesel technology of the future. Executive Vice President of MAN B&W Diesel, Peter Sunn Pedersen, and President and CEO of ENERGI E2, Torkil Bentzen, have just signed the agreement, which makes this diesel attraction possible.

The agreement about the new venue is in place: President and CEO for ENERGI E2, Torkil Bentzen, and Executive Vice President of MAN B&W Diesel A/S, Peter Sunn Pedersen. Peter Sunn Pedersen: "It is a dream come true. We are creating a location with free access for everyone, a gathering point for anyone interested in the history and development of diesel engines. I hope that it will become a natural place to visit, not least for engineers, marine engineers and students from Denmark and further afield."

Torkill Bentzen added, "I have the greatest expectations for this joint venture. Diesel engine history is unbreakably tied to that of electricity. It is technical and cultural history worth displaying, and it is a story which both Danes and international visitors should experience.

The infrastructure of the facility will be a joint responsibility, MAN B&W Diesel has rented the exhibition building from ENERGI E2 and will undertake the daily running of the centre. ENERGI E2 is responsible for external maintenance, including the construction of a new access road and new parking facilities for visitors.

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