New Low-Speed Engines for Containerships, Tankers

Wednesday, November 16, 2005
Wärtsilä introduced two new low-speed marine diesel engines, each of which will be available in two versions, namely the Wärtsilä RT-flex82C, RTA82C, RT-flex82T and RTA82T.

The two engines are designed for two different markets. The Wärtsilä RT-flex82C and RTA82C are intended to be prime movers for the propulsion of Panamax containerships with capacities up to 4,500 TEU at a typical service speed of about 24 knots. With cylinder dimensions of 820 mm bore and 2646 mm stroke, the RT-flex82C and RTA82C will be available with six to 12 cylinders to cover a power range of 21,720 kW to 54,240 kW at 87 to 102 rpm.

The Wärtsilä RT-flex82T and RTA82T are designed to provide power for the propulsion of large tankers, VLCCs and ULCCs of 200,000 tdw to more than 350,000 tdw. With cylinder dimensions of 820 mm bore and 3375 mm stroke, they will be built with six to nine cylinders to cover a power range of 21,720 kW to 40,680 kW at 68 to 80 rpm.

The first engines of the new types are expected to be completed towards the end of 2007, in cooperation with Hyundai Heavy Industries Co Ltd supporting in engine production design and testing by using their existing facilities and manpower.

The separate 'C' and 'T' versions are designed in parallel using the platform concept. Their parameters are standardised as far as possible, except principally the piston stroke, of 2646 mm for the 'C' version and 3375 mm for the 'T'. As a result, many components can be same for both versions, allowing benefits of rationalization in the design and manufacturing, lowering manufacturing costs, and rationalizing also spare parts stocks.

The Wärtsilä RT-flex82C and RT-flex82T engines incorporate common-rail technology with full electronic control of fuel injection and exhaust valve operation.

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