New Security Equipment Used At Staten Island Ferry Terminals

Wednesday, April 04, 2007
According to the NY1 the Department of Transportation is using portable explosive detectors in the Staten Island Ferry Terminals. The Department of Transportation commissioner to demonstrate how the devices work. The detectors can identify more than a dozen explosives, and officials say four of them are now used regularly at the terminals. Some 65,000 people pass through the terminal every day, and officials say the number of people whose bags are checked changes depending on the maritime security threat level – or MARSEC level, which us set by the Coast Guard. The city got the money to buy the detectors from federal grants to protect ferry services. Source: NY1
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