New Sinkable Barge for Salvage Ops

Wednesday, January 14, 2009
Worldwide, $1.2b of ships, boats, pollutants and the like are salvaged from oceans and lakes annually. The Salvage-Retriever from Marine Flotation Products reduces the need for costly, awkward cranes, chains and other heavy equipment, while providing a means to clean-up debris fields or raise articles to the surface for reclamation. Extremely durable, it can be used repeatedly for years. The patent-pending Salvage-Retriever is composed of two inflatable pontoons attached to a collapsible frame carrying a submersible barge. With the pontoons deflated, Salvage-Retriever quickly sinks to the bottom of a lake or ocean. Divers load the barge with the salvaged articles, then the pontoons are inflated, raising the barge above the surface for safe retrieval. It can then be attached to its own mini-tugboat (sold separately) to transport the salvaged goods or marine hazards to another vessel or to shore. Salvage-Retriever is available with a standard 15 ft by 30 ft barge and 40 inch diameter pontoons, or custom-made to any size to meet a salvor's specific needs. The standard Salvage-Retriever weighs only 2,000 lbs. and lifts 40,000 lbs. With a working air pressure of 3-10 psi, the pontoons inflate in 5 to 7 minutes, depending on size. The fiberglass composite frame and container are simple to assemble and disassemble for ease of transportation and use. Constructed of rip-stop polyester laminated on both sides with polyurethane, the bags are durable and salt-water resistant. The system utilizes a low-pressure, high-volume air inflator/deflator. Another option is to use a standard air compressor. The permanent, water-proof hoses and connections from the pump to the pontoons are individually designed for each custom order. (www.marineflotationproducts.com)

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