Newfoundland and Labrador Get Marine Navigation System

Monday, June 10, 2002
With the help of a small Canadian technology company, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has installed the first fully lit marine navigation system in the world. Carmanah Technologies Inc. of Victoria, B.C., has invented a small, powerful, lightweight - and, most importantly, inexpensive - solar-powered marine light that completes the CCG’s quest to build a low-cost lighted navigation buoy that runs for five years with no maintenance. "Carmanah lights are small and lightweight so local fishermen can install and remove them each year around the fishing season. We provide a better service to our clients, reduce costs and help local communities," says Mike Clements, Manager of the Aids to Navigation Program for the Canadian Coast Guard in Newfoundland and Labrador. The St. John's office of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) provided valuable feedback during the product s development. The result is that the CCG is now able to outline the entire Labrador and Newfoundland coast (23,000 km) with 1,650 lighted buoys – half of which are outfitted with Carmanah's short range LED (light emitting diode) lights. And Carmanah will announce a major sales agreement with the CCG’s Atlantic region within the next week. There is no other fully lit aids-to-navigation system in the world. Before Carmanah's solar powered LED technology, such a complete system was far too costly. The CCG expects to save $830,000 annually in Newfoundland and $2,900,000 nationally by introducing lighted buoys that have a 5-year lifespan. Previously, big coast guard ships were needed to haul big buoys in to change their lights and batteries. Installation of the new, smaller lights and buoys can be contracted out to small operators in local communities, helping create employment and give locals control over the navigation lights they rely on. The CCG is excited about this because it will save fuel costs and ship time and allow them to focus their resources on other tasks such as search and rescue and environmental protection.
Maritime Reporter April 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Offshore

Royal IHC Congratulates the King in a Special Way

  Royal IHC is very honored to be part of the program on the King’s Birthday. Among other activities, the King and his family will be viewing a ‘Grande

Falklands' Oil Drilling at Isobel Deep Suspended

Oil explorers drilling in the waters north of the Falkland Islands have suspended work on the second well of their 2015 current six-well drilling campaign after a technical problem.

Arctic Nations to Fight Climate Change Despite Russia Tensions

The eight Arctic Council nations pledged on Friday to do more to combat climate change that is shrinking the vast frigid region, with countries trying to put

Navigation

The Need for Marine Spatial Planning

The sea is not empty.   Ports, harbors and waterways have to manage an ever growing volume and mix of recreational activity and heavy commercial activity - at

Bulker Aground in St. Marys River

A 603-foot bulk carrier ran aground in the St. Marys River near De Tour Village, Michigan, early Wednesday.   The motor vessel Mississagi, a Canadian-flagged bulk carrier with a load of stone,

Synergi Plant gets New Dashboard

Synergi Plant version 5.2, the latest DNV GL plant integrity software solution, has now been released. It includes a brand new user interface and several new

 
 
Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2132 sec (5 req/sec)