NTSB Chairman: Passenger Ferries Need Safety Management System

Tuesday, November 08, 2005
National Transportation Safety Board Acting Chairman Mark V. Rosenker said the nation's passenger ferries need aggressive safety management systems. He encouraged ship owners and operators to use a safety management system to resolve safety problems before casualties or incidents occur, rather than to simply comply with regulations imposed from outside. In his speech he noted that, safety management systems are mandatory for U.S.-flag vessels on international voyages. The Federal regulations, however, do not apply to U.S. vessels that operate on domestic waters, including the Staten Island Ferry and most other ferry operations in the country. However, this may be changing, as Congress has mandated that the Coast Guard develop safety management system regulations for domestic towing vessels. According to the National Ferry Database, ferries operate in 40 states and in some territories. In 2002, ferries operated by 42 agencies carried nearly 58 million passengers and annual ferry ridership exceeded 1 million in five urban areas (Seattle, New York City, San Francisco, New Orleans, and Boston). "A safety management system necessitates a cultural change in an organization so that the safety of operations is the objective behind every action and decision by both those who oversee procedures and those who carry them out," Rosenker said. "The system leads to standardized and unambiguous procedures for each crewmember, during both routine and emergency operations. Duties and responsibilities are specified for each staff member and for standard and emergency operations. Supervisory and subordinate chains of command are also delineated," he added An accident can result not only in death or injuries, damage costs, lawsuits, and lost revenues, but also in the distrust of the public who use transportation services. A corporate safety culture for safety equipment, trained and qualified individuals, good crew work-rest cycles, and reliable equipment far outweigh the financial losses of an accident, Rosenker said.
Maritime Reporter August 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Workboats

Mississippi River Closed Due to Collision, Spill

A unified command team continues its response Friday to an oil spill in the Mississippi River following a collision between two towboats at mile marker 937 in Paducah

Ailing Crewman Medevaced from Cable Lay Ship off US

A crew member reportedly suffering from a heart attack was air lifted by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter crew from a cable-laying vessel 80 miles west of Coos Bay, Ore.

Comprehensive Winch Outfitting for New Trawlers

Fishing company HB Grandi of Iceland recently awarded Naust Marine a contract for complete winch outfitting of three new 180 ft. fishing trawlers.   The contract,

Maritime Security

HMS Prince of Wales’ Final Carrier Block Delivered

The final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier produced by Cammell Laird arrived at Babcock Rosyth Facilities in Fife on Thursday, September 3,

Virginia-Class Submarine Named USS Iowa

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus hosted a ship-naming ceremony today in Ames, Iowa to announce that SSN 797, a Virginia-class attack submarine, will bear the name USS Iowa.

Russian Spy Ship near US Nuke Submarine Bases

Fox News and the Washington Free Beacon reported the presence of a  top Russian spy ship off the coast of Kings Bay, Georgia and is capable of cutting undersea cables.

 
 
Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.3675 sec (3 req/sec)