NZ Navy ROV IDs Sunken Princess Ashika

Thursday, August 20, 2009

On August 18 the Remote Operating Vehicle (ROV) operating from the Royal New Zealand Navy Diving Tender, HMNZS Manawanui, has allowed formal identification to be made of the sunken vessel resting on the seabed as the Princess Ashika.

The ROV identified the vessel by allowing the Royal New Zealand Navy’s (RNZN) Diving and Underwater Search Team to read the ship's name plate. Conditions on the surface are not currently favorable but the Navy team is continuing with its efforts. The water clarity is reported to be very good and this has allowed the team to conduct a thorough search of the sunken vessel.

One side of the Princess Ashika is obstructed and the ROV is unable to see into the passenger compartment. The vessel is sitting flat on the seabed and appears to be intact.  No images of the vessel from the ROV are currently available.

The ROV has been able to enter the cargo hold and is providing information to the Transport Accident Investigation Commission investigator. The Navy team onboard Manawanui is continuing with its operations and hopes to return to Nuka’alofa tomorrow as planned.

The Commanding Officer on site, Lieutenant Commander Andrew McMillan, said, "Although the team are very happy to have formally identified Princess Ashika, they are frustrated and disappointed at not being able to provide any further information that may bring closure to the Tongan people".

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter January 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Casualties

Topaz Responder Saves Refugee Migrants

Topaz Energy and Marine has emerged as an unlikely player in the effort to save refugee migrants risking their lives on the sea crossing from Turkey to Greeceā€™s islands in order to reach Europe.

USCG Issues Zika Virus Precautions

Recently, the World Health Organization designated the Zika virus as a global public health emergency. This has prompted questions from the maritime industry regarding

Boxship Aground Near Port of Hamburg

A Chinese container ship that is one of the world's largest has run aground on the river Elbe near Germany's largest port Hamburg but shipping to the harbour continues as normal,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0461 sec (22 req/sec)