Proposed Lock Replacement will Increase Flood Control and Navigation

Tuesday, February 11, 2003
Better flood control and navigation are the goals of an $80 million proposal to replace the Bayou Sorrel Lock between Baton Rouge and Morgan City, La., the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday. A public meeting is scheduled Thursday, Feb. 13, at 6:30 p.m., in the Ibervillle Parish Council chambers, 58050 Meriam Street, Plaquemine. Citizens are asked to comment on the alternatives that have been investigated in the draft feasibility study report and draft environmental impact statement. The Bayou Sorrel Lock is located on a 64-mile-long shortcut from the Mississippi River to Morgan City that avoids a long, indirect trip through New Orleans. The shortcut is the Morgan City to Port Allen (Baton Rouge) Alternate Route of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The Bayou Sorrel Lock is located at the juncture of the Alternate Route and the East Atchafalaya Basin Protection Levee. The lock is at the town of Bayou Sorrel, which lies on the protected (east) side of the levee. Increased flood protection is proposed because the Atchafalaya Basin levee is eight feet higher than the gates of the Bayou Sorrel Lock. The gates and lock constitute continuation of the levee across the waterway.

This flood-control system cannot be modified to pass a project flood safely. A new, larger lock is proposed because vessels are experiencing delays of 2.4 to 4.1 hours per towboat-barge combination. The new lock’s dimensions would be 1,200 feet long by 75 ft. wide. The present lock measures 799 by 56 feet. Depth would remain 15 feet. The Corps of Engineers would buy an additional 102 acres of land to accommodate construction. At present, the Corps holds channel and dredged- material placement easements on this land.

It is expected that the study will be completed by June. Engineering and design would be completed in 2005. Then, cons truction would take about three years, weather and funding permitting. Vessels would continue to use the existing lock while the new one is built in the dry. Keeping the Alternate Route open would allow towboats and barges to avoid a 234-mile detour through the New Orleans area when operating between Baton Rouge and Morgan City. This would also make it possible to avoid creating vessel-traffic jams at the Corps’ navigation locks on the West Bank near New Orleans. Alternatives considered Flood-control-only plans would safely pass the project flood in the Atchafalaya Basin, but not reduce navigation delays. The flood-control only alternatives include (1) an independent float-in flood gate, located on the floodway (Atchafalaya Basin) side of the lock, and (2) A new lock with the same dimensions as the existing lock. Flood control and navigation plans would safely pass the project flood and reduce delays to navigation. Alternatives for a new lock include 75 by 1,200 feet and 110 by 1,200 feet.

Maritime Reporter October 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Ports

Fednav Celebrates Anniversary Trio in Cleveland

Fednav Limited held a reception on board one of its vessels, the Federal Mayumi, at the Port of Cleveland yesterday to celebrate a trio of anniversaries: the 70th

WRRDA: Clearing the Channel for P3 Projects

A Creative Combination for Financing Inland Waterways Infrastructure Earlier this year, the U.S. maritime industry in general, and the inland waterways industry in particular,

BMT Supports Samalaju Port Development

BMT subsidiaries in the Asia-Pacific region have been awarded a contract to provide design expertise for an advanced bulk-material handling system for the emerging port of Samalaju in East Malaysia.

Navigation

MSC Approves SOLAS Amendments

SOLAS amendments to make IGF Code mandatory approved by Maritime Safety Committee   The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC),

Night Moves on America's Waterways

Overnight operations are certainly not unusual on America’s inland waterways, but that doesn’t make them any less hazardous. Onboard activities that seem so straightforward

Avoiding the Edges of the Sea

Mariners do best when they avoid the edges of the sea – the shoals, rocks, and other hard spots.  Coming into contact with the edges of the sea at other than a

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1394 sec (7 req/sec)