RCI President Apologizes For Alaska Pollution

Friday, September 03, 1999
The president of Royal Caribbean International toured ports of call in Alaska on Friday to apologize in person for the pollution of the state's waters by the cruise line's ships. Royal Caribbean last month agreed to pay a record-high $18 million fine to U.S. authorities for dumping oily bilge and chemical wastes at sea, as well as into U.S. ports and wild waterways. The line plead guilty to 21 felonies, including falsifying logs and lying to the U.S. Coast Guard, and admitted Royal Caribbean ships were rigged with secret bypass pipes, which were used to dump used dry-cleaning chemicals and other waste. The fine, the highest ever assessed by a cruise line for polluting U.S. waters, followed $9 million in fines Royal Caribbean agreed to pay in 1998. The Miami-based firm also agreed then to put in place a court-supervised environmental program. Jack Williams, president of Royal Caribbean International, one of two lines owned by parent Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., last month said the latest violations were "a lapse in our enforcement efforts - not a lapse in our corporate conscience or our commitment to protecting the ocean." Traveling aboard a Royal Caribbean cruise ship, Williams and other executives met environmentalists, government leaders and citizens in Skagway, Haines, Juneau, and Ketchican, company officials said. "We like that they came to Skagway and apologized," said Buckwheat Donahue, director of the small coastal city's tourism office. "We didn't ask them to that." Some two dozen people in Skagway met with Williams, who promised to exceed government requirements on cleansing waste water from Royal Caribbean ships. Skagway, with just 800 year-round residents, draws 540,000 cruise passengers during a five-month season beginning on May 1, and has 16 ships docking regularly throughout the summer. Alaska is one of the most popular destinations for North America's thriving cruise sector. In its plea bargain last month, Royal Caribbean acknowledged polluting waters between Haines and Skagway, as well as dumping toxic waste into a channel with Juneau.

Offshore

STX to Slash Jobs, Sell Yard

To stat above water by restructuring, South Korean Shipbuilder STX Offshore & Shipbuilding Co. plans to lay off about a third of its workforce and sell a yard in France, says a report in WSJ.

Onshore Spending on the Cusp of Recovery?

DW’s recently released quarterly World Oilfield Services Market Forecast (OFS) and World Oilfield Equipment Market Forecast (OFE) continue to suggest 2016 will

US Offshore Lease Sale Yields $18 Mln in High Bids

Today’s U.S. oil and gas Lease Sale 248 garnered $18,067,020 in high bids for 24 tracts covering 138,240 acres in the Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area, announced

Cruise Ship Trends

MV WERFTEN, Foreship Sign Design Agreements

MV WERFTEN signed a letter of intent with the engineering company Foreship in Stralsund today. The agreement includes parts of the basic design as well as design,

Vard Bags Hapag-Lloyd Cruises contract for 2 Vessels

Vard Holdings Limited (“VARD”), one of the major global designers and shipbuilders of specialized vessels, is pleased to announce that it has secured contracts

Lucas Marine, Harbor Breeze Cruises Partner to Cut Fuel Costs

Lucas Marine is partnering with Harbor Breeze Corporation to help reduce the yacht charter and cruise company's fuel costs, maintenance and environmental impact in Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Port Authority Ship Repair Ship Simulators
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0685 sec (15 req/sec)