Ruling Favors NCL

Wednesday, September 13, 2006
According to the AP, a federal judge has denied class-action status in a $100m negligence lawsuit filed by passengers aboard a cruise ship that was struck by a 70-ft. rogue wave in April 2005. The decision by U.S. District Judge Cecilia M. Altonaga means that the lawsuit will not automatically cover the more than 2,000 passengers who were aboard the 965-ft. Norwegian Dawn when it encountered heavy seas off South Carolina. The National Transportation Safety Board concluded in December that the ship's captain and crew acted properly during the April 16, 2005 incident. The ship was heading from the Bahamas to New York. Source: AP

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