Russian Nuclear Sub Towed Home

Wednesday, April 25, 2001
A Russian nuclear-powered submarine was towed to port this month after an apparently minor accident in the Barents Sea, where the Kursk sank last year with the loss of 118 lives, Norway said on Wednesday. "We registered that a Victor III class submarine was towed to port...there was nothing to indicate that it was a serious accident," said commander Per Hoiby, a spokesman for the Norwegian armed forces. He said that the submarine had been trailing "smoke or exhaust...It could, for instance, have been a problem with a diesel generator." Nuclear submarines sometimes also use diesel generators. The Kursk submarine sank in the Arctic Barents Sea in August with the loss of all 118 sailors aboard. Hoiby said that the latest accident happened about a week and a half ago. The Victor III class is 106 meters long and has a crew of 85. - (Reuters)
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