Safety Program for Commercial Fishing Vessels

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

The Chesapeake Marine Training Institute (CMTI) offers a maritime safety program specifically for commercial fishing vessels.

“Since its inception, hundreds of boats and crew members have completed the program and the demand just keeps increasing,” said John O’Leary, maritime safety instructor for CMTI and the head of the safety and survival program. “In an industry that is already struggling, the program is becoming increasingly requested and thanks to the funding of the insurance companies, we can continue to grow and increase its numbers.” This program is offered by Sunderland Marine Mutual Insurance Company, Ltd through Brown and Brown Flagship in a joint effort to reduce casualties.

Established in 2005, the program is offered to commercial fishing vessels and its owners, on a volunteer basis. In 2008, over 100 vessels and crews completed the program. Initially available in the mid-Atlantic region, it is now available for commercial fishing vessels from North Carolina all the way to Cape May, New Jersey. According to Chris Burns, executive vice-president and general manager of Brown & Brown Flagship, “We are fully invested in this program. A safer crew makes for a safer vessel and it is a win-win situation for everyone. It’s clear that fewer accidents equal less loss of life and property equal lower claims equal lower insurance costs to the vessel, etc… the list goes on. It’s simply a benefit to everyone involved.”

Beyond basic United States Coast Guard requirements for onboard safety equipment and its various uses, there is no required safety program that covers onboard fires, flooding, electrical/fueling accidents, mayday calls, and survival and rescue tactics, among many. The U.S. Coast Guard does require that all fishing vessels have a safety drill once a month but since these drills are not monitored nor do they require a written record, many captains acknowledge that with a crew already under the stress of long hours and quotas to meet, this is often overlooked and/or outright ignored.

This CMTI safety program is different in many ways. First, it is conducted when a vessel is in port so there are no other distractions. After an initial safety orientation of approximately six hours that includes onboard fire, flood, use of all vessel safety equipment, mayday protocol, fuel shut off valves, circuit breakers, survival suits, life rafts/EPERB deployment and more, additional drills specific to any number of topics, such as fire drills, are performed every 30 – 60 days when a vessel in port. O’Leary is currently handling all orientations and follow-up drills but as the demand increases, he is seeking to expand the program so that more crews can be trained.

(www.flagshipgroup.com)

Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Education/Training

BHP Billiton Communities and EWB Provide Support to 5 Students

BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities and Engineers Without Borders Support Students in Sustainable Development September 16, 2014 Five university students

TWC Funds Training of 195 Mariners at San Jacinto College

Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) informs that its Chairman, Andres Alcantar, recently visited the San Jacinto College maritime training center to present a $368,

Maritime Academy Awarded DHS Grant for Arctic Training

Maine Maritime Academy receives $450,000 grant From U.S. Department of Homeland Security for ice navigation and maritime first responder courses for the Arctic Maine

Maritime Safety

Bangladeshi Albedo Survivors Helped by their Govt.

Yesterday, 16th September 2014, Chirag Bahri, MPHRP's Regional Director for South Asia, attended a ceremonial event organised by the Ministry of Shipping, Bangladesh

Simmons Assumes Command of USS James E. Williams

Capt. Anthony L. Simmons relieved Cmdr. Curtis B. Calloway as commanding officer of the guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) at sea on Sept.

Ship Safety: IMO Committee Agree Draft IGF Code

IMO informs that the draft International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), along with proposed amendments to make the Code mandatory under SOLAS,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2328 sec (4 req/sec)