Sealift Ships Transfer to Ready Reserve Force

Thursday, October 02, 2008

As of October 1, 2008, eight Fast Sealift Ships officially became part of the Maritime Administration’s Ready Reserve Force.  While custody of the eight ships (Algol, Altair, Antares, Bellatrix, Capella, Denebola, Pollux, and Regulus) was transferred from the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command to the Maritime Administration on October 1, 2007, the title was only transferred as of the beginning of Fiscal Year 2009. 
Fast Sealift Ships are currently the fastest cargo ships in the world, capable of speeds in excess of 30 knots (56 km/h\).  The ships are capable of sailing from the U.S. East Coast to Europe in just six days and to the Persian Gulf via the in only 18 days, thus ensuring rapid delivery of military equipment in any crisis.
When combined, all eight Fast Sealift Ships are able to transport nearly all the equipment needed to outfit a full mechanized division of the U.S. Army.  They were put into the Ready Reserve Force because of the proven efficiencies and cost-effectiveness of the Ready Reserve Force ship management program. 

Maritime Today

The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter November 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds


Fincantieri Launches Nuclear Waste Vessel for Russia

New semisubmersible floating platform will be used to transport special material decommissioned by the Russian Navy    Itarus, the new semisubmersible floating

Port of Bronka Prepares for Opening

Technical plant and equipment installation for the first stage of Bronka’s port facilities is now complete with the Liebherr LHM 800 mobile port crane installed at the end of September,

Vesper Marine Debuts New AIS Transponder

Marine safety products manufacturer Vesper Marine has released a new Class B Automatic Identification System (AIS), the XB-6000. The black box transponder includes

Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0808 sec (12 req/sec)