Seattle Cruise Ship Project Approved

Wednesday, July 17, 2002
The Washington State Department of has approved plans by the Port of Seattle to refurbish Pier 90 to accommodate a temporary cruise ship terminal. Plans by the Port of Seattle to refurbish Pier 90 to accommodate a temporary cruise-ship terminal will actually be better for the environment, according to the Department of Ecology. Ecology's authorization certifies that the Port's plans meet federal and state requirements for protecting shore areas and water quality, and it enables the Port to begin construction this summer so that cruise ships may begin docking at the facility next spring. The project will benefit the environment by replacing Pier 90's deteriorating, creosote-treated wood piles with a smaller number of concrete piles. The old-style wood piles leach toxic creosote into the water. Replacing them with concrete supports will eliminate that source of contamination and provide more light for fish. Ecology approved the Port's application in just four weeks so that work could begin quickly and be finished by April 2003. "We recognize the importance of the cruise industry on the state's economy, and this project will have the added bonus of improving water quality in Elliot Bay," said Ecology Director Tom Fitzsimmons. "We appreciated the Port's efforts to provide us all the information we needed to review and approve the application without delay." Ecology's certification includes conditions that will protect water quality during construction and also incorporates permits from the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and the city of Seattle, which set terms for protecting habitats and shorelines.
Maritime Reporter March 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Offshore

Nations Convene for Arctic Maritime Discussion

Citing an increasing need to ensure safety, security and stewardship of Arctic waters, member countries of the Arctic Council gathered at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters

Advanced Drillships a Burden for Owners as Business Slows

Not so long ago, advanced drillships costing more than half a billion dollars each and capable of operating in ever-deeper waters practically guaranteed big profits for oil-rig operators.

Russia May Allow More Firms to Offshore Oil

Russia may allow more oil companies to access its offshore projects, Energy Minister Alexander Novak said on Friday.   "In general, the access can be extended," Novak told reporters in Moscow.

Cruise Ship Trends

Holland America Line Ships Score 100

On recent routine United States Public Health inspections (USPHI) conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Holland America Line’s ms Statendam,

Carnival to Add Nine Ships to Cruise Fleet

Carnival Corporation enters into strategic partnerships to add nine cruise ships to its fleet over a four-year period starting in 2019; shipbuilders Fincantieri

US Cruise Industry Preparing for Cuba

U.S. cruise lines are preparing to enter uncharted waters -- Cuban waters.   Although U.S. tourists are still technically banned from visiting the Caribbean country,

 
 
Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1319 sec (8 req/sec)