Shipyards Work Together

Wednesday, September 11, 2002
NAVSEA’s Portsmouth Naval Shipyard teaming with General Dynamics Electric Boat (EB) is ahead of schedule this year on one of the Navy’s most challenging projects, the USS Memphis (SSN 691) Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). This availability is different than most, particularly in the manner in which the work is being accomplished. A partnership of EB and Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNS) workers is doing the work on Memphis while it is at EB. Leading the combined team of submarine maintenance experts is Robert M. Fortier, a 27-year PNS veteran.According to Fortier, the Memphis Project Team has some of the best people the two shipyards have to offer. “I have stood in utter amazement watching these craftsmen work in harmony,” he said. “They’re taking apart and working on large components that were never designed to come apart-it’s remarkable!”The support from everyone involved in the SRA has been tremendous, according to Fortier. Even last-minute requests in the sometimes unpredictable business of submarine maintenance have been met with both vigor and professionalism. While Fortier believes the PNS-EB team is extremely capable, he credits the ‘bus driver’ of the project-his Assistant Project Superintendent, Richard R. Blouin, also from PNS-with leading the team to excellence. “Dick is a true leader; and even in the face of nearly impossible tasks, he keeps the focus on the overall project. His energy and experience are unmatched.”This is the first time a PNS team has worked on an SRA with EB folks in an EB drydock. Before the start of the project, the two shipyards met and came to an understanding of how work would be accomplished. “It’s great to have a PNS team working at our facility,” said Stephen LeBlanc, 25-year EB pipefitter. “This is my sixth time working with our friends from Portsmouth and I’ve always had a good experience. They are very cooperative, know the meaning of teamwork, and always appreciate my work. We’d work with them anytime!”Fortier noted that everyone in the submarine community is watching this work. “We’re going to undock this boat early,” he promised. “And everyone will say ‘That was the most technically difficult SRA the Navy has performed this year.’” They’ll be right, and the SRA will likely hold that distinction for many years to come.
Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navy

Australia, New Zealand Navies Intercepts Drugs off Africa

A combined Australian and New Zealand operation 260 km off the coast of Africa has seized more than 5.6 metric tons of cannabis resin worth an estimated $280 million (AUD).

China's Navy Enters Strait of Hormuz

Bandar Abbas, home of Iran's navy and the main port in the strategically important Strait of Hormuz, is currently hosting two Chinese naval vessels on a five-day goodwill visit,

ONR Funds UW Oceanographic R/V Refit Contract

The US Department of Defense informs that the University of Washington (UW), Seattle, Washington, is being awarded a $12,776,050 cost reimbursement contract for

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Standards Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1226 sec (8 req/sec)