SNAME Elects New Fellows

Friday, August 14, 2009

On June 1, 2009, the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers announced new additions to its rank of Fellows. The membership grade of Fellow is accorded to individuals who have contributed to significant achievements in naval architecture, marine and ocean engineering, and related fields in the form of advances in design, research, production, operation, education, and associated management. The new SNAME Fellows are:
 
G. Russell Bowler: As the Chief Engineer/Vice President of the largest and most successful sailing yacht design company in America, Russell has served as the lead naval architect in numerous groundbreaking designs.  Mr. Bowler introduced modern composite construction to the Round the World Race of 1985/86 with the outstanding success of the maxi-yacht UBS Switzerland. KZ-1, the New Zealand America’s Cup challenger of 1988 broke new ground in size, construction, and speed of construction.  Her carbon mast was at the time the largest in the world.  A pioneer in the use of lightweight FRP sandwich construction in high-performance racing yachts, Mr. Bowler’s innovative structural solutions were the precursor to currently accepted norms for race yacht construction.  Under Russell’s guidance, the design office developed composite design and building techniques that strongly influenced industry standards used today.

James A. Cole: Mr. Cole is a 55-year veteran of the marine industry.  Among other significant achievements, he played a key role in the development of West Coast-style tuna fishing vessels, among other significant achievement.  Starting his career in the USCG, he subsequently worked for Philip Spaulding, MARCO Seattle, Tacoma Boatbuilding, The Glosten Associates, Foss Shipyard, and Elliott Bay Design Group.  His design expertise includes tugs, notably the Ship Docking Module.  Mr. Cole has presented technical papers at national and international venues, including local and national SNAME meetings as well as the International Tug and Salvage Conference.  Mr. Cole has been writing a series of articles on the development of fishing vessels in the Pacific Northwest.  As a result he has been in contact with many members of the fishing and shipbuilding community to capture oral histories.  Mr. Cole is ensuring that future naval architects will have an understanding of how Northwest fishing vessels have been designed to suit the fisheries, geography, and sea conditions that are found from Oregon to Alaska.

Harilaos Psaraftis: Professor Psaraftis was an outstanding professor and researcher for ten years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and for the past 20 years, at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA).  His accomplishments include the development of a methodology for evaluating oil spill response decisions at strategic and tactical levels, methodologies for routing and scheduling problems for ships and other vehicles, research in ship safety and environmental protection.  Despite his academic background, and his lack of managerial or political experience, Professor Psaraftis managed to survive as CEO of the Port of Piraeus for more than five years, while container traffic doubled, the port was transformed into a corporation, and systems were computerized.

John M. Ringelberg: Captain Ringelberg has over 30 years experience in shipbuilding, repair, operations, ship design, and related marine and industrial engineering work.  His merchant marine, navy, commercial marine and industrial experience provides him with a broad background in many engineering disciplines.  He is an alumnus of SUNY Maritime College, Webb Institute, and Stevens Institute.  As president of JMS Naval Architects and Salvage Engineers, he is a hand on participant in many of the company’s engineering and operational assignments and oversees JMS subsidiary Divers Institute of Technology.  Captain Ringelberg is a recognized expert in ship salvage, naval architecture, and industrial energy and is President and CEO of the Ocean Technology Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to marine science, research, exploration, and education.

Douglas Wolff: Douglas Wolff graduated from Webb Institute in 1977.  Since launching his career in the commercial marine industry, Mr. Wolff has enjoyed ever increasing levels of project and corporate responsibility in the Seattle area.  He has worked for Jeffboat, Trinity Industries, Marco Seattle, and for the last 16 years, with Elliott Bay Design Group.  He is a talented “blank sheet” designer with a comprehensive understanding of all aspects of  naval architecture.  His notable design efforts include Crowley Voight-Schneider tractor tugs, Protector and Guard, the 64-car Woods Hole Ferry Island Home  (subject of a paper at the 2008 Annual Meeting and now the basis of a new pair of Washington State Ferries as well), and the Sause articulated tug-barge.  Over the last fifteen years, Mr.Wolff has taken on increasing responsibility in the management of Elliott Bay Design Group, becoming Chief Naval Architect in 1995, and Vice President of Operations in 2002.

Dr. Richard C. Boutwell: Mr. Boutwell has a 14-year record of service to the Society and to the marine industry related to the training and the education of future shipbuilders and shipbuilding leaders.  He has focused on student involvement and development, and has initiated the Student Congress at the Annual Meeting, one of its most successful and popular events.  Dick Boutwell produced the original “Call of the Sea” video, which has been so popular over the years, and which is still in use by the SNAME “SeaPerch” Outreach Program.  Dr. Boutwell formed the first Student Steering Committee and, as its Advisor, has continually promoted a system of student governance within the Society, leading to student representation at a national level on both the Executive Committee and the Council.  He proposed the first Student Summit in 2001, and using Normative Group Technique, promoted communication among students and between students and senior members of the Society.  Dr. Boutwell’s most recent achievement has been the formation in 2005 of the Society’s newest and most unique Student Section, at the Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Apprentice School.  Under his guidance, its student members are developing expertise in design, manufacturing, construction, testing, and best practices for ship producibility.  In 2008, the Apprentice School and Dr. Boutwell designed and hosted a regional design competition for its local high school students, which is expected to be taken statewide in 2009 and nationwide thereafter.  Dr. Boutwell has contributed to books on training, and has published articles on best training practices and techniques.  He recently participated in a paper presented at the 2008 Annual Meeting entitled “Reaching out to the Future Generation of Shipbuilders and Shipbuilding Leaders.”

Richard C. Rodi: Mr. Rodi is an experienced and accomplished naval architect, well known and respected in the industry.  Mr. Rodi started at the American Bureau of Shipping, rising to head the Ship and Offshore Stability unit, where he contributed to the development of criteria for ABS, USCG, IMO and other regulatory bodies.  He has been a long-term member of the ABS Committee on Naval Architecture, and now serves on its Technical Committee.  He has held leading technical and management positions at three major naval architecture firms:  George G. Sharp, Inc., M. Rosenblatt & Son, Inc., and AMSEC LLC.  During this period he has provided innovative and sound engineering to numerous new ship designs, conversions, and alteration programs.  He is an author of several papers and is a licensed Professional Engineer.  In his present position, Mr. Rodi manages design and provides quality assurance for naval architecture projects, drawings and specifications for new construction and conversions.  He directs naval architects and engineers in feasibility, concept, preliminary and contract design projects, and prepares technical sections and cost estimates for proposals.  Mr. Rodi is the Program Manager for DSNY transfer station conversion project for containerization of municipal solid waste.  Recent projects include cruise ship re-engining, hatch cover and container storage modifications for container ships, owner modifications to new product tankers, survey of South Street Seaport Museum ships, and modifications to the museum ship Intrepid to open more spaces to visitors. 

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