Sperry Marine to Supply Navigation Systems for New Tankers

Tuesday, March 16, 2004
Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Sperry Marine has received orders to supply navigation and bridge systems for 12 new tankers to be built for Italian ship owners at shipyards in South Korea and China. The value of the contract was not disclosed. The ships include four 46,000 dead-weight tons (dwt) product tankers for D'Amico Soc Di Nav, six 51,000 dwt product tankers for Pietro Barbaro SpA at the STX Shipbuilding Co. in Chinhae, South Korea, and two 74,500 dwt product tankers for Fratelli D'Amato SpA at the New Century Shipbuilding Co. in Jianjiang, China. The new ships are scheduled for delivery by Northrop Grumman's Sperry Marine business unit over the next two years. Each of the ships will be fitted with a complete suite of integrated navigation systems and type-approved voyage data recorders (VDRs) by Sperry Marine.
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