Surface Strike Group Makes Surge Deployment

Wednesday, April 19, 2006
More than 700 Sailors on two surface ships “surged” April 18 as part of the Global War on Terrorism Surface Strike Group (GWOT SSG) 06-2 from their homeports in Norfolk, Va. and Mayport, Fla. The amphibious transport dock USS Trenton (LPD 14), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, and the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), homeported at Naval Station Mayport, with embarked LAMPS Detachment, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 44, Det. 9 deployed. The guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) homeported at Naval Station Norfolk will depart at a later date to join the group. As a surface strike group, Trenton, Hue City, and James E. Williams will enhance naval presence for combatant commanders in support of the ongoing global war on terrorism. All three ships can operate independently or in conjunction with other maritime forces. “We’ll be doing a wide variety of things. Basically we’ll be supporting the global war on terrorism. Whatever the CENTCOM (U.S. Central Command) requirements are for us, that’s what we’re going to do,” said Cmdr. Samuel Norton, Trenton commanding officer. “Trenton is a very versatile ship with a flight deck, well deck, and, of course, with the Sailors on board we can do almost anything.” This “surge” deployment is designed to be flexible and will provide presence and strike power to support joint and allied forces afloat and ashore. Under the Fleet Response Plan, a simple realignment of schedules makes this deployment possible. This is the first deployment for James E. Williams. source: NavNews

By Journalist 2nd Class Joshua Glassburn, Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet Public Affairs

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