Third Bayport Berth to be Redesigned

Wednesday, June 27, 2007
TOOA third berth planned at the new Bayport container terminal will be redesigned, after larger than expected ships began calling at the facility. Bayport's lead tenant, CMA CGM, is bringing vessels of almost 1,000 feet long.

The Port of Houston Authority was not aware the French company would be using the 998-ft. ships at Bayport. Previously, CMA CGM mostly had been using 950-ft. vessels, which could more easily be accommodated. The Port of Houston Authority Commission approved a contract increase of more than $480,000 Tuesday for Dannenbaum Engineering to cover the additional design work for the expansion.

The planned Berth 3 wharf will be 332 feet longer to provide berthing space for two ships. Additional dredging and moorings also are needed due to the larger ship sizes. The first phase of the Bayport container terminal opened earlier this year and construction is under way on the cruise terminal. Source: Houston Chronicle

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