This Day in Naval History - Sept. 03

Wednesday, September 03, 2008

From the Navy News Service

1782 - As a token of gratitude for French aid during the American Revolution, the United States gives America (first ship-of-the-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost in Boston.
1783 - Signing of the Treaty of Paris ends the American Revolution.
1885 - First classes at U.S. Naval War College begin.
1925 - Crash of rigid airship Shenandoah near Byesville, Ohio.
1943 - American landings on Lae and Salamaua.
1944 - First combat employment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when Navy drone, Liberator, controlled by Ensign James M. Simpson, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island.
1945 - Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony aboard USS Levy (DE 162).


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