Toxic Spill Source a Mystery

Monday, August 15, 2005
An investigation to find the ship that spilled a toxic fumigant near the Poor Knights Islands in April has uncovered a gap in international fumigation standards, but has been unable to identify the offending ship. The Magnesium Phosphide cargo fumigant, which was packaged in about 50 cardboard tubes, was active and a danger to the public so a major recovery operation was carried out. During its investigation into the incident, Maritime New Zealand identified a gap in international legislation surrounding a lack of standards that prohibit Magnesium Phosphide being discharged at sea. Maritime NZ has bought this to the attention of the International Maritime Organization, so other incidents such as this can be prevented. Maritime NZ Deputy Director Bruce Maroc says it’s frustrating not to have been able to prove what ship discharged the fumigant, given the extensive investigation that followed the incident. “Although this substance isn’t harmful to the marine environment, it’s a danger to people if they come in contact with it. That’s why ports have special provisions for disposing fumigants like this. “While we’re disappointed that the crew of a ship acted recklessly by deliberately dumping this material, it’s reassuring that this is the first time an incident like this has been known to happen, as ships do use disposal facilities at ports. It should also be the last this happens, as we’re working with international authorities to amend regulations,” he said. The investigation included inspections of cargo ships that passed through the area, and perusal of the manufacturers and suppliers of the fumigant.
Maritime Reporter May 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

Wärtsilä's' Propulsion for Use with US Compliant ELA

Wärtsilä has developed propulsion systems that are capable of operating with Environmentally Acceptable Lubricants (EALs) and comply with the US Vessel General Permit 2013 (VGP-2013).

Arctic Sea Ice Decline

Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is at its lowest May level since records began in the 1980s, says Al Jazeera.    The lowest levels in the history of Arctic sea ice

Solarworld Wants Duties on Chinese Solar Goods in U.S. Extended

German solar manufacturer SolarWorld will apply to the United States for an extension of duties on Chinese panel imports that are due to end this year, weekly Euro am Sonntag said.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1082 sec (9 req/sec)