U.S. Navy Commissions USS Iwo Jima

Tuesday, July 03, 2001
The USS IWO JIMA (LHD 7), the U.S. Navy's and Marine Corps' newest large-deck amphibious assault ship, left the Pensacola Naval Air Station for her homeport in Norfolk, Va., following commissioning ceremonies here June 30. The new ship, produced in Pascagoula, Miss., by Ingalls Shipbuilding, a Northrop Grumman company, will become the newest member of Amphibious Group Two. "With a crew of about 1,000 sailors keeping order and helping our allies, this will be the best the United States of America has to offer," Gen. Michael J. Williams, USMC, assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, said of the USS IWO JIMA. "The photograph of the Marines raising the flag at Suribachi has become the icon of the United States Marine Corps. This ship also represents the courage of those Marines, and there will be a time when the Marines aboard this ship will go into combat again. We don't know where, and we don't know when, we just know we need to be ready. The ability, flexibility and fast reaction to war, makes the Marines the perfect choice for this ship." Secretary of the Navy Gordon England placed the USS IWO JIMA in commission for the U.S. Atlantic Fleet duty, saying, "Today, we pay homage to the courage, sacrifice and uncommon valor for those who fought for freedom in World War II and kept it on the sands of Iwo Jima. We also honor the men and women who will sail this great ship while continuing this fight for freedom. I would like to thank and congratulate the Ingalls supervisor of shipbuilding, Pascagoula team, for a job well done in building this fine vessel." U.S. Rep. Joe Scarborough of Florida's First Congressional District noted, "In the mid 1980's, America talked about building a 600-ship Navy. We were committed to making our strong Navy even stronger," said Rep. Scarborough. "Today, some speak of reducing our Navy to a 300-ship fleet. If we want to continue sending our number one export across the world -- which is freedom -- we must reverse that trend. We need to build more ships and we need to export freedom across the globe. Today, the men and women of IWO JIMA will begin to do just that." Rear Adm. Dennis G. Morral, USN, program executive officer, Expeditionary Warfare, said, "A lot will be said today about the heroes of Iwo Jima, but I'd like to commend some of the present day heroes, like the men and women who build these complex warships. I have been fortunate enough to witness Ingalls Shipbuilding producing these ships for over 15 years, and I'm amazed and thoroughly impressed at their work. Nobody does it better." Capt. John T. Nawrocki, USN, a native of Ambridge, Pa., and a 1975 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, assumed command of the new vessel, offering "special recognition to the Northrop Grumman Ingalls team that helps keep our Navy vibrant and modern ... they are master shipbuilders. The success of this government-industry team is manifested in the on-time delivery of this ship. IWO JIMA's entry into the fleet represents the very best cooperation of both the civilian and military components of our armed forces." Other commissioning participants included Vice Adm. Alfred G. Harms Jr., USN, chief of Naval Education and Training; Rear Adm. John B. Foley III, USN, commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; Major Gen. William A Whitlow, USMC, director, Expeditionary Warfare, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations; Rear Adm. James K. Moran, USN, commander, Amphibious Group Two; and Capt. Philip N. Johnson, USN, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion & Repair, Pascagoula. The 40,500-ton LHD 7, second in size only to the Navy's aircraft carriers, is designed to lay off a troubled area of the world, and insert its 2,000- member Marine Expeditionary Unit ashore by helicopters and 40 miles per hour hover craft.

Tanker Trends

Hellenic Petroleum Profits Rise on Higher Exports

Hellenic Petroleum, Greece's biggest oil refiner, posted a 20 percent rise in second-quarter core profit on Thursday, with higher exports offseting lower refining margins.

Alfa Laval Launches DuroShell LPG/E Cargo Condenser

With the new Alfa Laval DuroShell plate-and-shell heat exchanger, Alfa Laval aims to strengthen its offering in LPG/E cargo reliquefaction with a construction that

Navy Discovers Malaysian Tanker

Indonesia's navy has found a tanker carrying almost US$400,000 worth of diesel that was taken by its own crew last week due to a commercial dispute, says a report in AFP.

Navy

White House: Iranian Ships' Actions in Gulf Increase Risk of Miscalculation

Actions by Iranian vessels in several encounters with U.S. warships in the Gulf this week are cause for concern and increase risks of miscalculation, the White House said on Friday.

Australia Warns DCNS after Security Breach

Australian defence officials warned French naval contractor DCNS to beef up security in Australia, where it is preparing to build a A$50 billion ($38.13 billion) fleet of submarines,

Scorpene Submarine Data Leak: Setback to Indian Navy

India has began multiple investigations to determine the extent of damage caused by the reported massive leak of secret data detailing the combat and stealth capabilities

 
 
Maritime Standards Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0781 sec (13 req/sec)