US Navy Takes Cole Commander off Promotion List

Tuesday, August 22, 2006
The officer who commanded the USS Cole when it was attacked in Yemen in 2000 will not be promoted because he did not meet the standards expected of commanding officers, the U.S. Navy said on Monday. Almost six years after the al Qaeda attack that killed 17 sailors while the American destroyer was refueling, Navy Secretary Donald Winter pulled Cmdr. Kirk Lippold off a promotion list, saying he was not qualified to rise to the rank of captain, the Navy said in a statement. Secretary Winter determined that CDR Lippold's actions as the Commanding Officer of USS COLE prior to the attack on October 12, 2000 did not meet the high standard he expects of Commanding Officers, and, based on this, CDR Lippold was not the best and fully qualified for promotion to the higher grade, the Navy said.

The Cole was attacked and severely damaged when a boat filled with explosives pulled alongside it and detonated during a stop in Aden harbor. That led to a review of security procedures. While a Navy investigation found security lapses on the Cole before the attack, it did not punish Lippold -- a decision supported by then-Defense Secretary William Cohen. The Navy on Monday said Winter reviewed the findings and recommendations of that investigation in his decision to pull Lippold's name from the promotion list. Source: Reuters

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter May 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

Primeline Turns Against CNOOC

Primeline Energy Holdings Inc. announces that it has sent a letter to China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) and CNOOC China Limited (CCL) (together CNOOC

Sovcomflot IPO Soon

The long-awaited initial public offering (IPO) of Sovcomflot, which runs one of the world’s largest tanker and gas carrier fleets, has moved a step closer.    Economy

First Cruise Company Fined under Australia’s New Fuel Rules

Australia’s NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has fined Carnival PLC $15,000 after one of its P&O Cruises ships, the Pacific Jewel, breached new low sulfur fuel regulations in Sydney Harbour.

Navy

This Day In Naval History - May 24

1917 - The first U.S. convoy left Hampton Roads, Va. to cross the North Atlantic after entering World War I. During the 18 months of war while American vessels escort convoys through the war zone,

HII Secures Aircraft Carrier Planning Contract

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) was awarded a $152 million contract for advance planning for the construction of the third aircraft carrier in the Gerald R.

Ingalls Christens Amphibious Transport Dock Portland

Ingalls Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), christened the amphibious transport dock Portland (LPD 27) on May 21 in front of approximately 1,000 guests.

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0749 sec (13 req/sec)