Corvus Batteries For New Hybrid Tugboats

Press Release
Wednesday, September 19, 2012

New hybrid tugs for Australian Gorgon Gas Field Project will use Canada-based Corvus batteries to reduce operational and environmental costs.

More than two megawatts of batteries designed and manufactured by Corvus Energy will be at the heart of four new 542 kWh hybrid tugboats now being built for the Gorgon Project.

One of the world's largest natural gas projects, Gorgon is currently under construction 130 km off the west coast of Australia. Once complete, it will become the largest natural resource project in Australia’s history.

Since the Gorgon Gas Project is located in an environmentally sensitive area, project operators are endeavoring to create a world-class example of environmental management where conservation and development can successfully co-exist.

At one quarter of the weight of conventional batteries, Corvus’ AT6500 batteries are the world’s most power and energy dense batteries. In application, they deliver a fuel savings payback in about three years for large commercial marine vessels and also provide a significant reduction in harmful emissions.

The hybrid system is predicted to reduce C02 emissions and annual fuel costs enough to provide ROI in a few short years. The Gorgon Project is a joint venture between several global oil companies. The venture is anticipated to garner 35.3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, generate $300 billion in Australian export earnings, and have an estimated lifespan of about 40 years.

“It was an easy decision to select Corvus as our battery supplier,” said Ketil Aagesen, Sales Manager, Siemens AS, Industry Sector, Industry Solutions Division, Marine Solutions. “The company’s technology is impressive and we did not hesitate to incorporate Corvus’ high-performance, cost-efficient batteries into the drive trains we’re building for these tugs.”

Corvus Energy, based in Richmond, B.C., Canada provides industrial-sized power in a compact, modular lithium-ion battery system to commercial marine, transportation, ports machinery, remote community, off grid and grid energy markets.



 

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