Concordia Disaster to Cost Owners More than $2b

Posted by Eric Haun
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
Photo courtesy of the Parbuckling Project

The Costa Concordia disaster, when the cruise liner capsized off Italy more than two years ago, will likely end up costing the ship's owners just over $2 billion (1.5 billion euros), a company executive told a German newspaper.

"So far, our costs are at 1 billion euros. But that does not include 100 million for the ship to be broken up for scrap and the cost of repairing damage to Giglio island," Michael Thamm, chief executive of Costa Crociere - a unit of Carnival Corp and operator of the ship - told weekly Bild am Sonntag.

The disaster dealt a blow to the image of Carnival, the world's largest cruise operator, which in March forecast an annual profit below analysts' estimates as it cut prices and spent more on advertising to attract customers.

Luxury liner Costa Concordia hit rocks as it sailed close to the island of Giglio off Tuscany in January 2012, killing 32 people and setting off a chaotic evacuation of crew and passengers, some of whom jumped into the sea and swam ashore.

The hulk of the 290-metre ship was righted and secured in a complex operation last September and, with the arrival of calm summer weather, is due to be towed to Genoa to be broken up for scrap in the coming days.

"If everything goes well, we can complete this unprecedented salvage project this month," Thamm told Bild am Sonntag in an interview published on Sunday, adding he expected recycling of the ship to take almost two years.

Thamm said Costa Crociere managed to retain 95 percent of its customers following the ship's sinking, thanks in part to "significant" discounts. Some 50 to 60 percent of Costa Concordia's surviving passengers have since taken another cruise with the company, he added.

($1 = 0.7331 Euros)

(Reporting by Maria Sheahan, editing by William Hardy)

Maritime Reporter February 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Finance

Some Roads Reopened in Brazil, Truck Strike Persists

Striking truckers lifted their blockade of dozens of highways in Brazil after police began fining and arresting protesters, though strike organizers said they had

Lithuania Looks to U.S. for Gas

Lithuanian liquefied natural gas (LNG) importer Litgas has signed a preliminary agreement with a U.S. supplier, looking to lessen the Baltic nation's dependence on Russia.

Petrobras Denies Hiring JPMorgan for License Sales

Petróleo Brasileiro SA denied on Friday that it has hired JPMorgan Chase & Co to handle the sale of oil exploration licenses in deep-sea areas off the coast this year.

News

ClassNK Updates Guidelines for Floating Offshore Facilities

ClassNK released a new version of its Guidelines for Floating Offshore Facilities for LNG/LPG Production, Storage, Offloading and Regasification.   Available on the ClassNK website,

US, Chinese Navies Conduct Joint Exercise

A U.S. Navy littoral combat ship and a Chinese Navy frigate conducted a joint training exercise in the South China Sea.   The U.S. Navy littoral combat ship USS

Lithuania Looks to U.S. for Gas

Lithuanian liquefied natural gas (LNG) importer Litgas has signed a preliminary agreement with a U.S. supplier, looking to lessen the Baltic nation's dependence on Russia.

 
 
Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2528 sec (4 req/sec)