Polar Code Focus at Arctic Conference

Posted by Michelle Howard
Friday, January 17, 2014
Image: IMarEST

The Polar Code has been under development at the IMO for a considerable length of time but will reach fruition during 2014 after which it will be offered to the various nations to ratify. The Code seeks to provide a common reference for those ship owners, designers and – more importantly, perhaps – the ship users who will be operating inside the Arctic or Antarctic regions. The South Polar Region is already covered for a host of aspects by the Antarctic Treaty which has now been in force for many years.

The timing is therefore ideal for next month’s 2nd Arctic Shipping Technology Conference with its theme ‘Technical challenges of profit with environmental safety’ being held at One Wimpole Street, London (February 4-5) and organized by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST).

The two day conference sees Colin Manson FIMarEST, Director, Manson Oceanographic Consultancy delivering a keynote address on the opening morning on ‘Regulation and the Polar Code: The impact the Code will have on Engineering’.

“The Code itself will be brought into the international framework as an adjunct to those statutory instruments which already exist – such as the SOLAS or MARPOL regulations – and will have an immediate effect on all those operating in the Polar Regions,” he explains.

“There can be little doubt that the Arctic ice is melting more quickly and more extensively than ever before in recorded history; this in turn is opening up vast areas for development which have been either too costly, too remote or simply too cold in the past. The Northern Sea Route saw a ten-fold increase in the number of vessels using it and this trend will continue as the ice retreats further in the summer and returns only grudgingly in the winter.

“That being so, the region will remain isolated, hostile and dangerous for many years and it is these aspects that the Polar Code seeks to address. Ships need to be designed and operated to take this into account even as the conditions become more benign. The timescales, though, are part of what drives the need for the Code to come into force; most of vessels designed today will likely still be operating when the majority of the arctic is ice free in summer and the Northern Sea Route remains viable to non-strengthened vessels for perhaps three or four months.

Hinting at what he will be covering in his keynote address, Colin Manson explains: “The Code addresses the totality of operating in the polar regions – navigation, communications, the environment and so forth but what is of particular interest to the conference are those aspects which have a direct bearing on the engineering principles, techniques and requirements for current and future vessels.

“Scantlings and structures, life saving equipment, stability, machinery, water and weather-tight integrity – all these are addressed within the Code and will have an impact on the engineering within a ship. Some aspects will not be subject to ‘grandfathering’ – which is the agreement that new regulations will not be enforced on existing vessels – although most will. Health and safety, fire protection and machinery, too will be subject to additional regulations which will be enforced by the various Authorities across the globe.

“The major element within the Code is the requirement for all vessels operating within or transiting through the polar regions to hold a ‘Polar Certificate’ that will define the operational limitations of the vessel, the safe operating conditions and the procedures to be followed should the vessel either stray outside or be in danger of straying outside those limitations.”

More about the conference
Chaired by Professor John Carlton FREng, FIMarEST, Professor of Marine Engineering, City University London, a Past President of IMarEST and bringing together speakers from Finland, France, Germany, Norway, Russia and the UK, the conference also sees a keynote address ‘Strategic drivers’ delivered by Christian Le Mière, Senior Fellow for Naval Forces and Maritime Security, International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS).

Following the keynote addresses, the first session of the day looks at ship design – ‘Green ship for the Arctic’; EEDI and ice-going vessels – the key questions; ‘Complex approach to ice going vessels’ design: Ice performance, ice belt strength, maneuverability in ice, propulsions system’; and ‘Latest technology developments for ice transiting vessels’. This is followed by a session on Winterisation looking at ‘Reducing the impact of icing on operations and costs’; ‘Minimizing icing by the efficient use of power and environmentally friendly methods’; Using vibration – a new de-icing method for LNG and other pipes’; and the ‘Coatings Technology Forum’.

Day two begins with a session on Arctic Operations and with a presentation by Simon Culshaw FIMarEST, Director, CTS Marine Consultants Limited on ‘Sub-arctic environmental impact study and route optimization through remote sensing’; and then continues with ‘Crew training and risk management for Arctic operations’; ‘Life saving equipment – latest advances’; and ‘Spotlight on LNG – technical challenges of the NSR’.

The final session of the two day conference covers the all-important issue of Propulsion. Oskar Levander, VP Innovation, Engineering & Technology – Marine, Rolls-Royce will address ‘Propulsion solutions for ice operations’; which will be followed by ‘Podded propulsion in ice’; ‘Two-stroke main engines for ice classed ships’; ‘Finnish-Swedish Ice Class Rules for azimuthing thrusters’; and finally, under the topic heading ‘Ice Class approval and real time measurement’ there will be a case study on MV Scarven.

The Gordon Hodge Memorial Lecture
The first day of the Arctic Shipping Technology Conference will end with the Gordon Hodge Memorial Lecture, presented by Cdr Paddy Parvin, Principal Inspector Operational Reactors at Defense Nuclear Safety Regulator and, until recently, Nuclear Propulsion Operating Standards Regulator (NPOS). His lecture is entitled 'What does it take to be a Maritime Professional' and it will be open to conference delegates and non-delegates alike. The conference and lecture reception will follow providing an opportunity for networking.

Further information

Aimed at shipowners and operators; superintendents, marine engineers, structural and design engineers; naval architects and marine surveyors; health and safety executives; engine and equipment manufacturers; shipbuilding and ship repair experts; maintenance specialists; maritime administrations; and salvage and pollution response professionals, online registration for the 2nd Arctic Shipping Technology Conference is at www.imarest.org/arctic.

 

Maritime Reporter June 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

Research Vessel Heincke: Serving Science for 25 years

7 July 2015. A quarter of a century old, with over 900,000 kilometres (488,842 nautical miles) logged and still on the cutting edge of science and technology:

Water Conservation Measures at Panama Canal

The water levels at Gatun and Madden Lakes are currently well below the expected levels for this time of year. Based on a comprehensive analysis of historic data,

Aberdeen Pupils Peek into Subsea Oil & Gas Technology

Pupils at an Aberdeen primary school were given a rare insight into the depths of the oil and gas industry’s subsea sector after getting to sit in the driving

News

Indonesia Expects Total to Decide on Mahakam within days

French oil firm Total  will decide how much interest it will retain from 2018 in Indonesia's offshore Mahakam oil and gas block over the next two days, the

Asia-N Europe Container Freight Rates Jumps 60%

Shipping freight rates for transporting containers from ports in Asia to Northern Europe rose by 60.4 percent to $879 per 20-foot container (TEU) in the week ended on Friday,

Research Vessel Heincke: Serving Science for 25 years

7 July 2015. A quarter of a century old, with over 900,000 kilometres (488,842 nautical miles) logged and still on the cutting edge of science and technology:

Maritime Safety

Research Vessel Heincke: Serving Science for 25 years

7 July 2015. A quarter of a century old, with over 900,000 kilometres (488,842 nautical miles) logged and still on the cutting edge of science and technology:

Parkinson Retires from Sunderland Marine

Geoff Parkinson, chief executive officer of North P&I Club’s subsidiary Sunderland Marine, retired on 30 June 2015 following a period of ill health. Tom Rutter,

New Binding Law of The Sea Agreement Advanced

WOC Sustainable Ocean Summit (Singapore, 9-11 November 2015) Will Enable Industry to Organize its Input to this Major New Ocean Treaty Development The U.N.

Communication

Antwerp, Duisburg Ports to Upgrade Rly Link

The Port of Antwerp and duisport are intensifying their cooperation as the Port of Antwerp will participate in the existing rail shuttle service connecting the two ports.

Beier Radio is now Beier Integrated Systems

For 70 years, Beier Radio has provided engineering, sales, and service for marine electronics around the globe. As the corporation marks its 70th anniversary,

DPE is New Majority Shareholder in INTERSCHALT

Deutsche Private Equity GmbH (DPE) is set to become the new majority shareholder in INTERSCHALT maritime systems AG, the maritime software and services provider

Arctic Operations

First Subsea Wet Gas Compressor Installed

After several years of technology development, construction and testing the first subsea wet gas compressor in the world is now installed at the Gullfaks C platform in the North Sea.

U.S. Draft Recovery Plan for Threatened Polar Bears

U.S. wildlife managers released on Thursday a draft plan for stemming the decline of polar bears threatened by melting Arctic sea ice linked to global warming,

UK Navy’s Ice Patrol Ship Gets a New Coating

U.K. Royal Navy Ice Patrol Ship HMS Protector is deployed on operations for 330 days a year, mostly in the Antarctic region, making it essential that her underwater

 
 
Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2045 sec (5 req/sec)