New DNV JIP to Speed Up Subsea Construction

MarineLink.com
Wednesday, May 08, 2013
Bjørn Søgård (Photo: DNV)

One challenge in the construction of a subsea project is the long delivery time of large steel forgings used for key components. This is mainly due to compliance with oil companies’ individual requirements. DNV is now inviting the subsea industry to jointly obtain synergies by developing a best-practice approach. The aim is to reduce delivery time and production costs and improve material quality, thus reducing the risk throughout the supply chain.

Due to quality concerns, the end users of subsea systems are stipulating company-specific requirements for subsea forgings, such as those used for X-mas trees. “This has made the stocking of prefabricated forgings and thereby shorter lead times difficult for the vendor industry. The typical delivery time can be in excess of seven months, and has a high potential for being shortened,” said Bjørn Søgård, business development manager at DNV’s Well, Pipelines and Subsea Section.

“One prerequisite for shortening the lead times and effective project execution is the timely availability of forgings that meet all likely end users’ quality requirements. A unified set of requirements across the industry would be a solution with a synergetic effect, make procurement easier and help reduce quality challenges,” he pointed out.

On this basis, and in response to requests from key stakeholders in the subsea industry, DNV has now established a Forging-material Joint Industry Project (JIP). It will run for 14 months and include valuable contributions from major oil companies, subsea contractors and manufacturers of steel forgings. In addition, DNV will contribute the advice of its own pool of subject-matter experts. The conclusions will be presented in a Recommended Practice available to the industry.

Søgård explained that the core goal for all participants is to improve the quality, cost and delivery times of forgings for the subsea industry. “A unified approach will also help limit the risk of failure during fabrication, subsea installation and operation. The outcome will not only benefit the manufacturers and sub-suppliers, but also improve the end-customers’ way of specifying their requirements regarding mechanical loads, interfaces with other materials, environmental issues, cathodic protection, cyclic loading, etc,” he concluded.

The adoption of a unified material standard with a consistent methodology to manage all steps in the supply chain processes will help ensure consistently high and repeatable quality across the industry and geographical regions and build confidence into the final product. The JIP will be run with participation from the industry based in Houston, U.S. and Oslo, Norway.

www.dnv.com
 

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