Costa Concordia: Lawyers Maintain Owners Criminally Liable

MarineLink.com
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Photo credit Wiki CCL 2

Ronai & Ronai, LLP, a New York law firm that represents victims, including Sandor Feher, a musician who lost his life while trying to evacuate passengers, believes that the criminality of the deaths should also be placed on Costa Crociere/Carnival Corp., which was able to escape criminal liability simply because of their ability to pay a monetary fine.

On July 20, 2013, five crew members of the Costa Concordia cruise ship were convicted of manslaughter for their role in the shipwreck in January 2012, which resulted in the deaths of 32 people. The captain of the ship, Francesco Schettino, the only remaining defendant, is being tried separately. The owner of the cruise ship, Costa Crociere SpA/Carnival Corporation paid a fine of one million euro to avoid any criminal liability claim Ronai & Ronai.

Holly Ostrov Ronai, Esq. stated that "Costa Crociere/Carnival Corp. did not properly train their employees to safely and effectively evacuate the passengers on their ship. The evacuation of the entire ship off Giglio Island clearly should not have taken over six hours to complete. Although the five employees and Captain Schettino caused the allision itself, Costa Crociere/Carnival Corp. should be held responsible for the deaths of the 32 people and injuries to others."

"Instead of training their own crew members with proper evacuation procedures, the cruise line company made employees such as dancers and musicians, who were merely hired to perform shows on the cruise ships, in charge of certain evacuation procedures that they were not qualified to handle. Many of these performers did not even speak English or Italian." she added.

The criminal trial of Captain Schettino is scheduled to resume in September 2013.
 

Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

US Plans to Shut Royalty Loophole on Coal Exports

U.S. coal companies will no longer be able to settle royalties at low domestic prices when they make lucrative sales to Asia according to reforms proposed by the Interior Department on Friday.

Denmark Issues New Pilotage Regulations

In an effort to make the pilotage market more efficient, the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) issued several new regulations following on amendments to the pilotage act.

US Shippers, West Coast Dockworkers Union Resume Contract Talks

Negotiators for shipping lines and terminal operators at 29 U.S. West Coast ports resumed contract talks with the union for dockworkers on Thursday, as cargo backups continued at the ports,

Casualties

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

Report: Dire Conditions in Indian Shipbreaking Yards

Report by Indian research institute reveals poor enforcement of occupational health and safety provisions   The working and living conditions at the shipbreaking yards of Alang,

Wrecked Bulker’s Bow Refloated, Scuttled off S.Africa

TITAN Salvage, Crowley Maritime Corp.'s Houston-based marine salvage, emergency response and wreck removal company, has refloated and scuttled the largest section of the wrecked bulk carrier, Smart.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1270 sec (8 req/sec)