Scania Extends High Speed Engine Range

Edited by Joseph Keefe
Wednesday, August 22, 2012
The New Scania DI 16 Litre V8-Diesel Engine is now able to supply impressive 735 kW (1.000HP) at the flywheel. (Photo: PPM News Service).

New High-Speed SCANIA Marine Engine Range with Outputs from 294 to 735 kW (400 to 1.000 HP).

 

SCANIA is a tradition rich, 120-year old Swedish industrial company which traces its marine roots all the way back to 1902, when it produced its first engines for marine applications. Today, it is a company comprised of 37,500 employees and boasting an annual turnover of 87.7 billions SEK (13 billion US$).
 

The firm emanates from two companies, the first of which (VABIS) was established in 1891 and eventually produced bicycles, railway coaches and horse buggies. Later, its output included motor cars and trucks. The second enterprise (Maskinsfabriks Aktiebolaget Scania) produced boxcars for the Swedish State Railway in addition to rolled steel products. Production of motor cars began in 1901, and of trucks in 1903. Eventually, both firms merged in 1911 into Scania-Vabis, and since 1989, operates under the name of SCANIA. Although represented globally in about 100 countries, research and development is based in Sweden, whereas production is located in Europe and South America. All of it is rich in maritime tradition. And, that still holds true today.

 

SCANIA - Marine Engines
Scania’s engines for marine applications date all the way back to 1902; where they were initially known for their reliability and low fuel consumption. SCANIA began testing with diesel engines in 1927, with series production of their own diesel engines starting in 1936. The initial entry was a 6-cylinder pre-chamber diesel engine with seven main bearings and an output of 120 HP (88,8 kW). Those engines were primarily installed on inland navigation vessels, coasters, seagoing ships, passenger and port authority ships, lifeboats and trawlers, too. Today’s product range at SCANIA with the 13-litre engine at 323 kW and ends with the 16-litre engine with 736 kW (1.000 HP). The speed range of both the engines is between 1,500 and 2,300 rpm. For Yanmar, SCANIA also produces engines with outputs of up to 660 kW, primarily intended for pleasure craft. One thing that hasn’t changed over the years is SCANIA’s engine philosophy that is characterized by time-honored fundamentals that include a high percentage of common parts between the two series, high reliability, longevity, low fuel consumption and – of course – featuring low emissions.
 

 

The amount of common parts – or the so-called SCANIA module concept – includes, but is not limited to, pistons, cylinder liners, cylinder heads, gaskets, filters and unit-pump elements at the injection technology. The engines fulfill all existing worldwide current emission legislations. Each product intended for a marine application, passes a series of stringent tests which can run from 4 hours to 2 days. The company supplies the complete drive-line for ship propulsion – engine, transmission, instruments – from one source. Couplings, shafts and propellers are assembled from chosen, strategic partners.

 

13 and 16-litre engines for propulsion and auxiliary
Scania’s engine range illustrates the essence of maximum up-time, proven reliability and outstanding operating economy. Built into the compact and powerful package is Scania’s modular product system, which simplifies servicing and parts management, facilitates individual specifications, as well as expediting volume production. Power in the new in-line DI13 is available from 294 to 551 kW at speeds of 1,800 to 2,300 rpm for main-drives and outputs from 323 to 426 kW with speeds of 1,500 to 1,800 rpm’s for on-board gensets.
 
Scania Introduces its new DI16 Marine Diesel Engine
First showcased at this year’s Seawork Show in the United Kingdom, the new DI 16 diesel engine was especially developed for applications in workboats, patrol craft and yachts, too. With this entry, Scania hopes to consolidate its position in the marine market segment. The turbocharged and aftercooled engine is available as 8-cylinder, in V-90 degrees configuration. With 130 mm bore and 154 mm stroke, it features a displacement of 2.04 litres per cylinder. With the total displacement of 16.32 litres (a displacement increase of around 5% compared to the former DI 16 marine drive), the engine is capable of developing an output of 735 kW (1,000 HP). With a nod towards this impressive power increase, Robert Sobocki, Scania Vice President Engines, told MarineNews, “We are now highly competitive with engines well above 16-litres.” Indeed, the torque ratings of up to 3.340 Nm are particularly high for this output class, ensuring robust performance even at low revolutions, while allowing operations at favorable revolutions in all conditions, including heavy seas and high loads.
 

Individual cylinder heads with 4 valves per cylinder promote both easy maintenance and fuel economy. According to Scania, this new DI 16 engine meets the emission standards of IMO II, EU Stage IIIA and US Tier 2. The engine is equipped with a Scania developed Engine Management System (EMS) in order to ensure the control of all aspects related to engine performance. Beyond this, the injection system is based upon electronically controlled PDE unit injectors that emit low exhaust emissions, good fuel economy and high torque even at low revolutions.

 

Summing Up a Winning Marine Propulsion Story
According to Scania, their newest marine marine entry is a compact engine with easy connections to auxiliaries, all specifically designed for easy access and servicing. Scania's V8 engine traditionally meets all of these requirements thanks in part to itscompact vee-design, which reduces the overall length of the unit. Ancillaries can therefore be efficiently accommodated inside the ‘footprint’ of the engine.
 

Scania’s-Saver ring, placed at the top of each cylinder liner, reduces carbon deposits on the edge of the piston crown and reduces cylinder liner wear. Hence, and despite higher performance and tighter emissions regulations, Scania has nevertheless been able to raise maintenance and oil-change intervals to 500 hours. The new DI 16 diesel engine arguably has all the bases covered, especially for traditional workboat applications. New ideas continue to evolve from this 120-year old firm. And, given today’s onerous regulatory and tricky commercial environments, that’s not a moment too soon.  www.scania.com

 
+ (Published in the August 2012 edition of MarineNews - www.marinelink.com) +

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Maritime Reporter & Engineering News was founded by John J. O'Malley (1905-1980) in 1939, and today ranks as the world's largest audited trade publication in the world serving the maritime industry,

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Maritime Reporter & Engineering News was founded by John J. O'Malley (1905-1980) in 1939, and today ranks as the world's largest audited trade publication in the world serving the maritime industry,

 
 
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