New Fatigue Model Leads to More Durable Ships

MarineLink.com
Tuesday, April 23, 2013
The model allows for the development of lighter structures, and as a consequence, more energy-efficient ships.

Heikki Remes, a researcher at the Aalto University in Finland, has developed a model making it possible to determine how fatigue sets in with various welded steel materials. The model allows for the development of lighter structures, and as a consequence, more energy-efficient ships.

By utilizing modern manufacturing technology and new materials, it is possible to achieve more efficient structures than the ones that currently exist. In addition, better physical models are needed to ensure structural strength, Remes said.

At present the fatigue measurements used by classification societies are based on the average quality of the weld. The same design guideline is used both with traditional and more advanced structures. However, through the development of manufacturing technology, it is possible to achieve characteristics for welded joints that are significantly better than average. With the models that have been developed, it is possible to consider the difference between traditional and advanced structural joints and the impact on fatigue resistance.

The study has been published in the International Journal of Fatigue. The findings of the study can be used extensively in establishing models for fatigue endurance of various developed welded steel structures. The goal is to predict fatigue endurance more accurately and to utilize material in the final product more efficiently.

The work is linked with a project of the Academy of Finland on fatigue in thin sandwich panel structures and with the BESST EU project to promote the competitiveness of the European shipbuilding industry. Also under preparation are national development projects within the Finnish Metals and Engineering Competence Cluster (FIMECC). The work also supports the national maritime industry research strategy commissioned by the Federation of Finnish Technology Industries.

The research has received funding from the Academy of Finland, Tekes, STX Europe, and the Finnish Maritime Foundation, Light project – Finnish Metals and engineering Competence Center.

 

Maritime Reporter August 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Shipbuilding

Great Lakes Shipyard to Build Guatemalan Harbor Tug

U.S. shipbuilding and repair yard Great Lakes Shipyard informs it has signed a contract to build another of its HandySize Class, 3,400 HP twin-screw tugboat for

BAE Systems Welcomes Record Number of Paid Interns

More than 140 university students from across the country are being given a unique insight into working life at BAE Systems, as part of the company’s 12-week summer internship program.

Drydocks World World’s Largest Turret

Drydocks World marked a milestone in completing the world’s largest turret mooring system. At almost 100 meters high, weighing over 11,000 tons and with a diameter of 26 meters,

Marine Materials

MacGregor to Lay Off 100 Staff

MacGregor, part of Cargotec, plans to reduce workforce in MacGregor Uetersen site in Germany to restructure the operations to the weak market demand. The market

VIKING Expanding Australasian Activities

VIKING Life-Saving Equipment A/S has acquired a part of Australia-based Wiltrading Pty Ltd.’s maritime safety equipment activities effective 1 September. The

Break Bulk in Rotterdam on the Way Up

The opening of a new break bulk terminal is one of the many developments and investments in the break bulk sector in the port of Rotterdam; a sector that has

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.4817 sec (2 req/sec)