New PPG coating helps revive historic warship

press release
Wednesday, August 15, 2012

PSX ONE coating restores ‘Battleship of Presidents,’ now an interactive naval museum.

 

The USS Iowa protected America for nearly 50 years. Now PSX® ONE coating, an advanced marine coating introduced last year by PPG Industries, is protecting the ship.

 

Known as the “World’s Greatest Naval Ship” and the “Big Stick,” the 887-foot-long, 45,000-ton USS Iowa was first deployed in 1943. It is also called the “Battleship of Presidents” because it hosted more visits by U.S. presidents than any ship of its kind, including its historic escort of Franklin D. Roosevelt to the secret 1943 Tehran Conference with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin.

 

After serving during World War II in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets – and being the radio ship that transmitted news of Japan’s surrender from a berth in Tokyo Bay back to the U.S. – the USS Iowa fought battles in the Korean War, served as a bulwark against the Soviet Union during the Cold War and helped deter hostilities as late as 1987 in the waters of Central America and the Persian Gulf.

 

For most of the past two decades, though, the storied ship languished, most recently amidst a ghost fleet of more than 100 retired naval and merchant marine ships in northern California’s Suisun Bay.

 

When the Pacific Battleship Center was awarded the USS Iowa through the U.S. Navy’s ship donation program on Sept. 6, 2011, it had been more than 20 years since the ship was last removed from service. The nonprofit group sought to give the ship new life as an interactive naval museum at the Port of Los Angeles, but it required extensive work – and help from an advanced marine coating developed by PPG – to get the 70-year-old war veteran back into “ship-shape.”

 

Restoring an Aging Giant
After so many years of neglect, Mike Getscher, chief engineer and operations director for the USS Iowa, knew the task of restoring the tarnished behemoth to its former glory would require an effort as mammoth as the ship itself.

 

In addition to revitalizing more than 1,000 staterooms and compartments, the restoration team had to inspect – and often replace – more than 1 million rivets, 16 miles of ventilation ducts, 80 miles of pipe, 900 electrical motors, 5,300 light fixtures and 250 miles of electrical cable.

 

Externally, Getscher and his team had to replace the ship’s rotting wooden deck and repair its rusting metal hull. The task of repainting the giant ship was made even more challenging by the need to address layers of old, flaking paint that had accumulated through many recoatings.

 

PSX ONE to the Rescue
To refinish, seal and protect the deteriorating hull, Getscher researched a number of coatings suppliers before talking to Julio Mojica, a sales representative for PPG Industries’ protective and marine coatings business (PPG-PMC). After touring the USS Iowa with Getscher, Mojica suggested painting the vessel with PSX ONE coating, a single-component acrylic-siloxane coating PPG-PMC had recently introduced.

 

Mojica said the size of the ship was one reason for his recommendation. “The original plan was to repaint the ship in dry dock, but it was simply too big,” he said. “If we had to repaint the ship in the bay, we knew we wouldn’t be able to sandblast or hydroblast the hull for environmental reasons. That made PSX ONE coating an easy choice because it could be applied to the surface of the ship without any pretreatment.”

 

Four Months of Painting
Getscher said PSX ONE coating was ultimately chosen for its durability and application ease. “We selected the coating because it has unlimited coatability and because it will keep its sheen longer than traditional epoxy coatings without chalking up,” he said. “As a single-component coating, it was also faster and easier to apply than a two-coat system that would have required measuring and mixing ingredients before the paint could be applied.”

 

In addition to these advantages, PSX ONE coating’s low-VOC (volatile organic compound), non-isocyanate formulation makes it a more environmentally-responsible option than many other marine finishes.

 

Painting of the USS Iowa began in March 2012 and continued through May. Using brushes, rollers and sprays, a crew of up to 20 painters from Bay Ship & Yacht in Alameda, Calif., applied nearly 900 gallons of PSX ONE coating to the hull and infrastructure of the ship. PPG supplied the coating in five custom-mixed colors, including the U.S. Navy’s standard Haze Gray as well as black and small amounts of red, white and blue used to paint an American flag on the ship’s main gun turret.

 

One More Historic Journey
Over Memorial Day week, the warship was towed from Richmond, Calif., to Southern California. Along the way, it participated in the 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge, where its 15-story mast barely squeezed under the landmark crossing.

 

On June 9, the USS Iowa made a 3.4-nautical-mile final journey to Berth 87 at the Port of Los Angeles with hundreds of people on board, such as elected officials, financial supporters, reporters, veterans and former crew members.

 

Getscher and Mojica both took part in the ceremony and could not have been more pleased with the ship’s finished appearance. “She looked beautiful,” Mojica recalls. “Mike was happy. I was happy. Everybody was happy.”

 

More importantly, the pair expects the ship to retain its glossy sheen for years to come. “We’re expecting to get 15 years out of [the coating],” Getscher said. “The fact that it has unlimited recoatability should make it much easier to for us to maintain.”

 

On July 7, after years of work and planning, the USS Iowa opened in San Pedro, Calif., as a naval museum. In addition to touring the ship and virtually experiencing life at sea during active duty, visitors can look inside the ship’s powerful gun turret, climb inside its armored pilothouse and visit President Roosevelt’s stateroom.
 

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter May 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Tideland Signal Acquires Julius Signal

Tideland Signal Corporation, now part of Xylem, has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire certain assets of Julius Signal, extending the company’s portfolio

North P&I Club Repots Positive Financial Performance

North P&I Club reports that an exceptionally low year for claims has helped it increase its free reserves by $90 million to $428 million and deliver a combined ratio of 73.

Seaspan Responds to Canada’s NSS Announcement

In response to the Government of Canada’s announcement of a series of enhancements to strengthen the National Shipbuilding Strategy, Seaspan Shipyards’ president

Navy

BWTS Refit for Netherlands Naval Vessels

The Defense Material Organization has awarded three contracts to Goltens Worldwide’s Green Technologies business unit for the engineering and turnkey installation

Seaspan Responds to Canada’s NSS Announcement

In response to the Government of Canada’s announcement of a series of enhancements to strengthen the National Shipbuilding Strategy, Seaspan Shipyards’ president

This Day In Naval History: May 26

1943 - USS Saury (SS 189) attacks a Japanese convoy south of Kyushu and sinks transport Kagi Maru, about 10 miles north of the Nansei Shoto. Also on this date,

Coatings & Corrosion

WSS: Post-combustion Fuel Treatment Cuts Vessel Costs, Risk

Wilhelmsen Ships Service, a provider of products and services to the shipping industry, is advising vessel operators to wage war on soot. According to WSS, soot

Industry Group Developing New Hull Coating System

PPG’s protective and marine business has received EU Funding for a project which aims to produce a new fouling protection system for commercial vessels.   A project development group including PPG,

Petronas Chooses Jotun Antifoulings

Petronas has selected Jotun’s Hull Performance Solutions (HPS) antifouling system for two LNG vessels chartered from MISC.   The advanced antifouling coatings

Eye on the Navy

BWTS Refit for Netherlands Naval Vessels

The Defense Material Organization has awarded three contracts to Goltens Worldwide’s Green Technologies business unit for the engineering and turnkey installation

This Day In Naval History: May 26

1943 - USS Saury (SS 189) attacks a Japanese convoy south of Kyushu and sinks transport Kagi Maru, about 10 miles north of the Nansei Shoto. Also on this date,

Aquino: China Breaks South China Sea Deal

Philippine President Benigno Aquino on Thursday accused China of breaking a U.S.-brokered deal between the two nations on the Scarborough Shoal, an uninhabited rocky outcrop in the South China Sea.

History

This Day In Naval History: May 26

1943 - USS Saury (SS 189) attacks a Japanese convoy south of Kyushu and sinks transport Kagi Maru, about 10 miles north of the Nansei Shoto. Also on this date,

Mount Whitney Makes History

USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), the U.S. 6th Fleet flagship, made history today as the first amphibious command ship to have an MV-22B Osprey land on its flight deck, May 23, 2016.

Returning to the Scene of the Shipwrecks

A participant in a diving field school last fall, graduate student Tori Kiefer is back to help a new set of students learn the joy of surveying shipwrecks.   Last fall,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Port Authority Salvage Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1397 sec (7 req/sec)