Russian Icebreaker Order for Baltic Shipyard

Press Release
Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Atomflot awards a US$ 1.15-billion contract for a nuclear-powered icebreaker to Russia's Baltic Shipyard.

The ship is designed for operations in the western Arctic and shallow water areas of the Yenisei River and the Gulf of Ob.

The icebreaker is to be ready for operation by Atomflot by late 2017 and to be delivered to Atomflot’s Murmansk base.

The new-building is expected to be floated out in November 2015, with sea trials due to start in August 2017 and ice trials in November 2017.

Meanwhile, Atomflot announced an open tender in late June for a 60 MW icebreaker, for which construction Baltic Shipyard was the only bidder.



 

 

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