First Dacia Imports Arrive at Fos

MarineLink.com
Monday, April 14, 2014
Photo courtesy Marseilles Fos

The first 402 Dacia cars from Morocco have arrived at Fos aboard the Neptune Lines car carrier City of Oslo under a deal that will see 20,000 vehicles per year imported for the French market.

France-bound Dacia cars built at the Renault-Nissan plant in Tangiers are being handled at a new terminal operated by vehicle logistics specialist TEA, part of the Charles André group. The Marseilles Fos port authority chose TEA to develop and run the site last December following a call for tenders in November 2012.

The port already handles 220,000 vehicles per year at two other import/export terminals. The new 14-hectare facility, at the Brule-Tabac quay in Fos, will increase annual capacity by up to 60,000 cars.

 

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