Ship Stowaways Expensive & Inconvenient Passengers

MarineLink.com
Tuesday, December 10, 2013
Rudder recess stoways: Photo courtesy of West of England P&I Club

The issue of stowaways is one which has existed ever since vessels began to trade. Although the number of people attempting to gain free passage to another country has varied significantly over the years, the problem still remains, says the West P&I Club in a recent loss prevention bulletin, extracted as follows:
 
In the twelve month period to the end of 2012 the Club handled 51 stowaway cases involving 125 persons. The total incurred value was approximately $1 million and the number of stowaways involved in each incident typically ranged from 1 to 8. However, in one particular case 22 stowaways were found among a cargo of lumber. Although most hid within the deck stow, 2 stowaways concealed themselves inside a cargo hold also containing lumber and suffocated during the voyage due to the oxygen depleting properties of the logs.

Stowaways are expensive to process and repatriate, and it is often necessary to employ escorts to accompany them in transit when they are finally sent home. Vessels may also be delayed and fined. Moreover, it can be difficult to find countries willing to allow stowaways to disembark, particularly if they have no identification documents.

Void spaces around rudder stocks are a popular hiding place for stowaways [see picture].
 
High risk stowaway areas

In 2010 the International Group of P&I Clubs carried out research which, based on claims experience, identified the top ten ports world-wide in terms of stowaway boardings. All of these ports were in Africa. In addition, IMO conducted a similar study using submissions received from flag states which highlighted certain ports in Belgium, particularly Zeebruge, as attracting a large number of potential stowaways, many of whom were economic refugees from Afghanistan and Iraq.

Stowaway searches
The last line of defence is a thorough search of all parts of the vessel before sailing. Stowaways found while the vessel is in port, in a subsequent port in the same country or within the territorial waters of the country of embarkation are generally regarded as trespassers. In such circumstances it is usually possible to return them ashore at minimal cost and with little or no delay. The P&I Club advises that a comprehensive stowaway search should therefore be carried before the vessel leaves the berth or anchorage.
 
Source: West of England P&I Club

Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Sri Lanka Port Project: China Merchants, CHEC Invest $601-M

Two of China's largest port operators and engineering firms have agreed to invest in a $601 million terminal in Sri Lanka's Hambantota port, part of a series of

Viking Supply Ships Sell PSV 'SBS Cirrus'

Rederi AB TransAtlantic subsidiary Viking Supply Ships says it has sold the 1985 built platform supply vessel SBS Cirrus. The vessel has been delivered to its new owners,

UK Chamber Stance Neutral on Scottish Independence

The UK Chamber of Shipping is taking a neutral position in the Scottish independence debate and has given both the Yes and Better Together sides space on its website

Legal

Bangladeshi Albedo Survivors Helped by their Govt.

Yesterday, 16th September 2014, Chirag Bahri, MPHRP's Regional Director for South Asia, attended a ceremonial event organised by the Ministry of Shipping, Bangladesh

ICS Counsels Wisdom on Ballast Water Convention

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has reiterated its call for governments to address the serious implementation issues concerning the IMO Ballast Water

Ship Safety: IMO Committee Agree Draft IGF Code

IMO informs that the draft International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), along with proposed amendments to make the Code mandatory under SOLAS,

Ports

Sri Lanka Port Project: China Merchants, CHEC Invest $601-M

Two of China's largest port operators and engineering firms have agreed to invest in a $601 million terminal in Sri Lanka's Hambantota port, part of a series of

Gladding-Hearn Delivers Third NYPD Boat

With more than a dozen patrol boats and a fireboat built by Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation, operating in New York Harbor, the Somerset, Mass.,

China, Sri Lanka to Launch FTA Talks

Chinese President Xi Jinping began a visit to Sri Lanka on Tuesday agreeing to open bilateral negotiations for a free trade pact as Beijing tightened its embrace

Maritime Safety

Bangladeshi Albedo Survivors Helped by their Govt.

Yesterday, 16th September 2014, Chirag Bahri, MPHRP's Regional Director for South Asia, attended a ceremonial event organised by the Ministry of Shipping, Bangladesh

Simmons Assumes Command of USS James E. Williams

Capt. Anthony L. Simmons relieved Cmdr. Curtis B. Calloway as commanding officer of the guided-missile destroyer USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) at sea on Sept.

Ship Safety: IMO Committee Agree Draft IGF Code

IMO informs that the draft International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), along with proposed amendments to make the Code mandatory under SOLAS,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2287 sec (4 req/sec)