IMCA Consultation on International Offshore Diving Code of Practice

MarineLink.com
Friday, August 09, 2013

The International Code of Practice for Offshore Diving (IMCA D 014), published by the International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA), provides advice on ways in which diving operations can be carried out safely and efficiently. Risk management lies at its heart as it outlines minimum requirements, creating a safe level playing field for all diving contractors.

It also recommends how clients and contractors may analyze the safety implications of commercial requirements. Updated in 2007 from the original 1998 version, the latest updated text has now been widely circulated in draft form for international input and comment before the revised and updated version is published.

“Our code is an especially vital document for contractors and clients working in unregulated areas of the world; and it has been instrumental in improving diving safety, and time and again we hear that clients appoint contracting companies based on their adherence to and acceptance of the contents of D 014,” said Jane Bugler, Technical Director of IMCA . “While national regulations take precedence over the code, it may be used in a court of law to define good practice.”

“The code incorporates both the substantial experience and expertise of our members as well as reference to other IMCA guidance, now we have once again opened up consultation internationally – anyone wanting to comment can request a copy of our draft guidance from imca@imca-int.com; input is requested by September 27.”

imca-int.com
 

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