U.S. Coast Guard Participates in Costa Concordia Investigation

press release
Monday, November 19, 2012

The U.S. Coast Guard, joined by the National Transportation Safety Board, will be part of an Italian-led marine casualty investigation into the January 2012 grounding and partial sinking of the cruise ship Costa Concordia off the coast of Italy.
 

The incident left 32 people dead, including two Americans. Evidence, timeline, analysis, conclusion(s), recommendations and a draft report are to be formalized over the next few months of the investigation. The Coast Guard places the highest priority on the safety of passenger vessels, including those domestic and foreign vessels that embark passengers in the United States and embark U.S. passengers world-wide, ensuring they are in compliance with applicable international and domestic safety standards.


The Coast Guard routinely participates in casualty investigations, even those taking place overseas, and leads efforts at the International Maritime Organization to improve maritime safety, security and environmental protection standards.
Coast Guard and NTSB participation in the Costa Concordia marine casualty investigation is consistent with generally accepted international marine casualty investigation practices and with Coast Guard statutory authority in 46 U.S.C. 6101(g) and 6301.

Maritime Reporter October 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Coast Guard

The Legal Consequences of 46 CFR Subchapter “M”

As the holiday season and the end of another year quickly approaches, the towing industry patiently waits for the Coast Guard to finalize the long-awaited towing vessel inspection rule.

Migrant Rescue Draws Budget Concerns in the Mediterranean

Seafarers’ Rights International (SRI) has raised concerns about the implications for masters of the recent reports of the launch of the new EU Frontex operation

USCG & Ocean Safety Rescue Kayakers on Molokini Crater

The Coast Guard and Ocean Safety rescued two kayakers trapped on Molokini Crater Monday. Watchstanders at Sector Honolulu Command Center received notification at 3:20 p.

Maritime Safety

Avoiding the Edges of the Sea

Mariners do best when they avoid the edges of the sea – the shoals, rocks, and other hard spots.  Coming into contact with the edges of the sea at other than a

The Legal Consequences of 46 CFR Subchapter “M”

As the holiday season and the end of another year quickly approaches, the towing industry patiently waits for the Coast Guard to finalize the long-awaited towing vessel inspection rule.

Fire Departments Choose Sea-Fire Systems

Metalcraft Marine's Firestorm high-speed, aluminum fireboat represents a new generation in vessel technology, especially when fitted with Sea-Fire H Series engineered fire suppression systems.

Government Update

How Difficult is it to Obtain a Jones Act Waiver?

The American Salvage Association’s Jon Waldron provides the ultimate cabotage primer. There always seems to be constant chatter about waiving the Jones Act. In reality,

Energy’s Promising Future Threatened

Unrealistic Fears and Overstated Risks obscure the benefits of new seismic data. The United States stands poised on the edge of a bright energy future. After decades

Will Congress Pass Any Maritime Legislation in 2014?

Following its usual summer break over August 2014, Congress came back from its five-week summer recess and spent a whopping eight days or so back in session before recessing once again,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1483 sec (7 req/sec)