Passenger Safety, Loss & Injury Benefits – Denmark Legislates

Press Release
Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Cruise Ships, Greece: Photo credit USAF

Denmark ratifies the 2002 Athens Convention, improves protection for injured passengers

The purpose of the new legislation passed by Denmark's parliament is partly to ensure improved protection of passengers injured at sea, partly to ensure easier access to transferring ships to the Danish flag from abroad, which will contribute to increased growth in the maritime sector in Denmark.

The act is to form the basis of the Danish ratification of the 2002 Athens Convention relating to the carriage of passengers and their luggage by sea. At the same time, it is ensured that the Danish legislation is in accordance with the associated EU Regulation.

This means, among other things, that in connection with all commercial passenger transportation a mandatory liability insurance is required, just as the liability limit for injuries is increased, which will improve the possibilities of receiving compensation.

Today, liability insurance is not required in connection with passenger transportation by small ships, but this will not be so in the future.

In addition, the act will make it possible to have a ship registered with a time-limit. This ensures that, when a ship is flagged in from abroad, it is possible to register it preliminary on the condition that an original deletion certificate is procured within a time-limit (i.e. proof that the ship is not registered in another country and is free of any mortgages).

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