Marine Link
Thursday, September 29, 2016

Canadian Tour Boat Sinks

Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette released the following statement concerning the sinking of the tour boat Lady Duck, which resulted in the deaths of four passengers. The accident happened in the late afternoon of June 23, 2002, on the Ottawa River. “I would like to convey my condolences to the families and friends of those who died in this tragic accident. “We are cooperating fully with the Transportation Safety Board’s (TSB) investigation. A Transport Canada marine safety inspector is on the scene to keep me informed of the investigation’s progress and a Ministerial Observer will be appointed. Should safety deficiencies be identified, Transport Canada will take immediate action.

Updated Approval Process for Structural Fire Protection

Transport Canada, the Federal Government Department of Canada, now recognizes Type Approval Certificates for structural fire protection products on ships and offshore installations by Germanischer Lloyd. Transport Canada has updated its approval process. Type Approval Certificates released by Germanischer Lloyd are now accepted for installation in Canadian registered ships. Precondition: The approval criteria meet the International Fire Test Procedures Code (FTP Code), the latest regulations of the SOLAS Convention as amended and the Transport Canada Standard TP 14612. Transport Canada has modified its approval process because efficient and effective fire protection plays a decisive role in the safe and secure transportation of people and goods.

TSB Responds to Marine Safety Recommendation

The Transportation Safety Board (TSB) of Canada issued its Assessment of the response of Transport Canada to the earlier TSB Marine Safety Recommendation relating to structural fire protection and fire-extinguishing systems. Following the engineroom switchboard fire on a cruise ship in British Columbia, the TSB recommended that Transport Canada submit a paper to the IMO requesting a review of requirements for structural fire protection and fire-extinguishing systems. Transport Canada responded by suggesting that the TSB draft the paper for submittal to the IMO. The TSB drafted the paper and Transport Canada has submitted it to the IMO. The TSB will monitor subsequent IMO actions on this matter. Source: HK Law

Canada Issues Maritime Security Contract Tender

Transport Minister Tony Valeri announced a call for tender for contractors to review vessel security assessments and plans for large Canadian flagged vessels that navigate international waters, and the ports that serve them. Transport Canada is implementing International Maritime Organization (IMO) requirements concerning security plans for commercial vessels that operate internationally, as well as for the ports they visit. The IMO, through its International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS), imposes a number of security requirements on maritime operators, including a requirement that all vessels of more than 500 gross registered tons that operate internationally and their ports of call have security plans in place by July 1, 2004.

Transport Canada Announces New Security Requirements

Transport Minister David Collenette today announced a new marine security-reporting requirement for a wide range of Canadian-flagged vessels and port facilities. The Canadian requirement will complement new security rules announced today by the U.S. Coast Guard. "We have moved ahead with this action in response to input from stakeholders on the importance of a comprehensive security regime, our own assessment of the risks and threats in the marine sector, and our consultations with U.S. authorities," said Mr. Collenette. "Moreover, Transport Canada and the U.S. Coast Guard are working closely together to coordinate and harmonize the marine security regimes of the two countries, so that Canadian-flagged ships that meet our security standards can enter U.S.

Transport Canada Confirms Chute Evac System

Transport Canada has assessed the safety of both types of vertical chute Marine Evacuation Systems used by BC Ferries and has confirmed that both systems are safe for use by all passengers, including infants (babies-in-arms). Extensive testing of BC Ferries’ chute systems was conducted following possible concerns raised by the Union about the suitability of the systems for infants, elderly and severely disabled passengers. On October 6, 2003, RFD Beaufort conducted tests in Northern Ireland in the presence of Transport Canada representatives on the Marin Ark chute system to demonstrate the system’s ability to safely evacuate children under five years and the severely disabled. The Marin Ark chute system is installed on the Queen of Coquitlam.

Canada Fines Vessel Owner for Dumping Oil

Transport Minister David Collenette today announced that the federal government has successfully prosecuted the M/V Cala Palamos, a Cypriot-registered container vessel, owned by Nordpartner of Limassol, Cyprus and operated by Oldendorff K.E., based in Limassol, Cyprus, for the Canada Shipping Act (CSA) violation of unlawfully discharging an oily substance into Canadian waters. The pollution incident occurred while the vessel was berthed at Pier 36, in the Port of Halifax, on February 21, 2002. The vessel’s owner, Nordpartner, was assessed a penalty of $100,000 by the Nova Scotia Provincial Court in Halifax. Under the polluter pays provisions of the Canada Shipping Act…

Transport Canada Issues Ship Safety Bulletin

Transport Minister David Collenette today announced that Transport Canada has issued a Ship Safety Bulletin reminding vessel operators of recent amendments to the Lifesaving Equipment Regulations and Small Vessel Regulations that require safety briefings on all Canadian passenger vessels. In the course of its investigation into the sinking of the amphibious vessel Lady Duck on June 23, 2002, the Transportation Safety Board issued a Marine Safety Advisory to Transport Canada on July 19, 2002, suggesting that the department take steps to ensure that safety briefings are conducted by vessel operators. As of March 2002, all operators of passenger vessels are required to provide safety briefings to their passengers on or before the departure of the vessel.

Canada Makes Improvements for Safety

Transport Minister David Collenette announced that Transport Canada has given the Transportation Safety Board its third update on action taken to further improve the safety of small passenger vessels since the sinking of the True North II on June 16, 2000, in Tobermory, Ontario. “Transport Canada has made considerable changes to its regulations, inspection and certification of small passenger vessels following the sinking of the True North II,” said Collenette. Since its first and second updates in February and August 2002, Transport Canada has drafted proposed amendments to small passenger vessel regulations to require the stowage of lifesaving equipment in a readily accessible manner…

Transport Canada Selects EMS Satcom

EMS Satcom, a division of EMSTechnologies, Inc. reported that Transport Canada has selected the EMS SATCOM eNfusion Broadband high-speed data system to enhance marine pollution surveillance and detection on Transport Canada's National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) Dash 8 aircraft. Flight Acceptance Tests were completed in early November 2006. EMS SATCOM's eNfusion system was installed and integrated with the Swedish Space Corporation's (SSC) Maritime Surveillance System (MSS 6000) to allow for real-time transmission and replay of data. The advantage is that evidence captured during the pollution patrol can be directly transmitted from the aircraft to command centers or marine safety inspectors in real-time…

Canada Eyes the Shipbreaking Biz

Image: NGO Shipbreaking Platform

Canadian companies can get into the business of scrapping and recycling ships that have outweighed their useful life, reports Financial Post. When the life span is over, the ships are being sold to the countries that specialize in shipbreaking, such as Bangladesh, China, India, Pakistan and Turkey. This has been happening for the past few decades. When they scrap the ships, firms in these countries recover huge quantities of steel. Transport Canada says that some ships in the…

Marine Polluter Gets Fined

A Newfoundland and Labrador provincial court judge has ordered the Motor Vessel (MV) Project Europa to pay a $70,000 penalty for violations of the Canada Shipping Act associated with the unlawful discharge of an oily substance into Canadian waters. On August 23, 2003, a Government of Canada marine pollution surveillance flight detected a slick in the wake of MV Project Europa, a cargo ship registered in the Netherlands and owned by Biglift Goedkoop B.V.of Amsterdam. At the time, the vessel was approximately 65 miles south of Cape Race, NL and was traveling from Spain towards Montreal. Transport Canada Marine Safety in St. John's, NL made arrangements for the ship to be boarded at Trois-Rivières, Québec.

$70,000 Fine for Marine Polluter

A Newfoundland and Labrador provincial court judge has ordered the Motor Vessel (MV) Project Europa to pay a $70,000 penalty for violations of the Canada Shipping Act associated with the unlawful discharge of an oily substance into Canadian waters. On August 23, 2003, a Government of Canada marine pollution surveillance flight detected a slick in the wake of MV Project Europa, a cargo ship registered in the Netherlands and owned by Biglift Goedkoop B.V.of Amsterdam. At the time, the vessel was approximately 65 miles south of Cape Race, NL and was traveling from Spain towards Montreal. Transport Canada Marine Safety in St. John's, NL made arrangements for the ship to be boarded at Trois-Rivières, Québec.

Transport Canada to Coordinate with USCG

Transport Canada issued a News Release announcing a new maritime security program for Canadian vessels and port facilities. The program will complement new maritime security rules implemented by the U.S. Coast Guard. The goal is to establish a reciprocal system so that approved Canadian vessels may enter U.S. ports and approved U.S. vessels may enter Canadian ports.

$70,000 Fine for Marine Polluter

A Newfoundland and Labrador provincial court judge has ordered the Motor Vessel (MV) Nordic Fighter, a Norwegian-registered tanker, to pay a $70,000 penalty for illegally discharging a pollutant in Canadian waters. On June 22, 2004, a routine Transport Canada marine pollution surveillance flight detected three slicks in the wake of the MV Front Fighter (now known as the Nordic Fighter). The pollution incident was detected approximately 85 miles southwest of Cape St. Mary’s, NL. The Front Fighter was traveling from Yorktown, Virginia toward Whiffen Head, Newfoundland and Labrador at the time. Upon its arrival at Whiffen Head on June 23…

Canada to get Tough on Marine Polluters

Transport Minister Jean-C. Lapierre announced the purchase of new marine pollution aerial surveillance equipment that will significantly strengthen Transport Canada's National Aerial Surveillance Program. The $2.3 million contract will cover the purchase of the equipment, as well as the on-board crew training. "The Government of Canada is committed to preventing pollution from ships and to continuously enhancing the protection of our marine environment," said Mr. Lapierre. Transport Canada conducts aerial surveillance to detect marine pollution from ships. When such pollution is detected, charges may be laid under the Canada Shipping Act.

Marine Polluter Penalized $15k

A Prince Edward Island provincial court judge has ordered the vessel BBC Nordland to pay a $15k penalty for illegally discharging a pollutant in Canadian waters. On February 22, 2008, the BBC Nordland, a Gibraltar registered General Dry Cargo vessel, that was docked at the Port of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, spilled approximately 300 litres of hydraulic oil during offloading operations. As a result of the investigation carried out by Transport Canada, charges under the Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and for Dangerous Chemicals of the Canada Shipping Act were laid against the vessel in Prince Edward Island provincial court.

Canada Commissions Study on Underwater Noise

Green Marine has signed a nine-month contract with Transport Canada to provide insight on underwater noise generated by shipping and its effects on marine life, along with potential solutions. “This agreement is a logical next step following the Memorandum of Cooperation that Green Marine and Transport Canada signed in 2012,” explained David Bolduc, Green Marine’s executive director. To meet the contract terms, Green Marine has hired Véronique Nolet as project manager – marine habitat. While temporarily replacing the organization’s program manager last fall, she laid out the foundations for some of Green Marine’s future environmental performance indicators regarding underwater noise. She also set up a working group to focus on the issue and three meetings have been held to date.

Canada Proposal Target Dangerous Goods Transport

The Honourable Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, today tabled amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 in the House of Commons. The amendments would enhance security and safety in the transport of dangerous goods. "Our government is committed to ensuring public safety and security when dangerous goods are imported, handled or transported in Canada," said Minister Cannon. They would reinforce the existing Emergency Response Assistance Program, which requires emergency response assistance plans to be in place in the event of safety incidents involving dangerous goods. It would also make it possible for Transport Canada to request the implementation of such plans in the case of a terrorist or other security incident.

Vessel Charged with Illegal Discharge in Canadian Waters

Transport Minister David Collenette today announced that the federal government has successfully prosecuted the MV Cape Benat, a Liberian-registered chemical tanker, for spilling canola oil in Vancouver Harbour. The pollution incident occurred while the vessel was loading canola crude oil at Vanterm, in the Port of Vancouver, on November 23 and 24, 1999. The MV Cape Benat is owned by the Cape Benat Navigation Company of Liberia and operated by Columbia Ship Management of Cyprus. The vessel was charged with unlawfully discharging a noxious liquid substance into Canadian waters, a violation of the Canada Shipping Act. The British Columbia Provincial Court imposed a $60,000 penalty on the vessel owner, the Cape Benat Navigation Company.

Safety Agency Lays Off More Workers

Amongst those receiving notices today are technical inspectors responsible for marine safety and security, as well as civil aviation airworthiness inspector. "We are deeply concerned for the safety of the travelling public. Once again, inspectors in marine safety and security as well as civil aviation are being chipped away at a time when we both know there are not enough inspectors to do the work," said Christine Collins, National President of the Union of Canadian Transportation Employees. Included in this number is the elimination of communication specialists and various administrative functions and, most notably, all regional Health and Safety Advisors who were recently hired to help bring the department into compliance with federal Health and Safety legislation.

Canada Proposes New Rules for Dangerous Cargo

Canada’s Minister of Transport Lisa Raitt proposed new amendments to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations that would enhance reporting requirements and expand data collection. The proposed amendments would apply to the transportation of dangerous goods in all transportation sectors. The proposed amendments would broaden the scope of the original reporting requirements and help improve emergency response and risk analysis through stronger, more comprehensive data collection. This additional information would allow Transport Canada to establish more effective regulations in the future. New reporting requirements would also be put in place for dangerous goods incidents involving road vehicles…

Canada Aims to Improve Ocean Health

The Honourable Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, announced a five-year commitment, including more than $60m in initiative, by Canada's New Government to the Health of the Oceans Initiative. The investments are expected to improve ocean health and the economic health of coastal communities. Reportedly, Transport Canada will invest $23.85m under this initiative and Canada's New Government is adding $42.5m to the $19.0m announced in Budget 2007 for Canada's National Water Strategy.

 

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Sep 2016 - Maritime & Ship Security

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