Marine Link
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

JNPT Now Harnessing Solar Power

Photo: Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust

India’s largest container port, Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT) will now harness solar energy and reduce its dependency on conventional electricity from the grid. JNPT is installing solar power plant on several rooftops in its township and commercial premises. This green initiative by JNPT is part of its push towards becoming the most sustainable energy generation port organisation in India. Rooftop solar plants allows the use of roof of buildings, an area which is otherwise not usable, for sustainable energy generation also ensuring financial savings.

India, Korea Sign Pact for Seafarers Certificate

Indian PM Narendra Modi and the President of Republic of Korea, Ms. Park Geun-hye in Seoul. Photo: Narendramodi.in

The Government of India has given nod for a pact between India and Korea that would pave the way for recognition of each other's certificates on maritime education and training for seafarers. The decision was taken by Union Cabinet at its meeting chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. "The Union Cabinet under the Chairmanship of Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi has given its approval for signing of an Undertaking between India and Korea on Mutual Recognition of Certificates," says a statement.

India's GSL Delivers Patrol Vessel to Mauritius

Photo: Press Information Bureau, India Govt

Indo-Mauritian maritime defence Co-operation got another fillip with the delivery of first Fast Patrol Vessel, MCGS VICTORY, designed and built in-house by Goa Shipyard Limited(GSL) for Mauritius Coast Guard, on 26th September 2016 at GSL. The vessel is primarily designed for Coastal Patrolling, Anti-piracy, Anti-smuggling, Anti-drug Surveillance, Anti-poaching Operations, and Search and Rescue Operations. The vessel is 50 meter long, fitted with 30 mm CRN-91 Gun, 12.7 mm HMGs…

HMM Mulls Buying Hanjin's 37 Boxships?

Photo: Hanjin Shipping

Hyundai Merchant Marine (HHM), South Korean’s second largest shipping line, is believed to be looking into buying troubled carrier Hanjin Shipping's 37 container vessels, reports WSJ. HHM will be the first to look at Hanjin’s vessels, with the focus on five 13,000-container ships. But it isn’t certain HMM will find the money to buy the ships, which could go for around $90 million each. The South Korean government and Korea Development Bank (KDB), Hanjin’s biggest creditor, are believed to support HMM if the firm decided to acquire Hanjin assests.

Pirates Attack, Loot Container Ship

(Image: Google Maps)

Pirates stormed a container ship off the coast of Guinea on Wednesday, making off with money and some of its cargo but leaving the crew unharmed, the government said. They fired guns and briefly held the crew hostage while they were looting the ship named Wendok, Guinea government spokesman Albert Camara said by telephone. He did not have details of the flag Wendok was flying under, the company running it, what its cargo was nor the nationalities of the crew. He said that Guinea's navy had been alerted but that the pirates had escaped before it could catch them.

Egypt Cancels Ergot Zero-tolerance Policy for Wheat

Egypt has reversed a controversial zero-tolerance policy on ergot fungus in wheat, the cabinet said on Wednesday, after receiving no offers in the previous three international tenders.   The government is reinstating the 0.05 percent international standard which will apply to all outstanding and future wheat contracts. It will contract an international firm to conduct ergot inspections on wheat shipments, it said in a statement.   The zero-tolerance policy had led to the suspension of 540,000 tonnes of wheat shipments, the government said. Egypt is the world's largest importer of wheat.   (Writing by Ahmed Aboulenein)

Australian Port Sold for $7.3 bln to Consortium

Photo: Port of Melbourne

A consortium of global and domestic funds, backed by investors including China Investment Corp, agreed to buy Australia's busiest port for a higher-than-expected A$9.7 billion ($7.3 billion), a sign that tough equity markets are helping fuel appetite for infrastructure. Australian leaders will also hope the deal shows they still welcome Chinese investment in infrastructure. The federal government last month blocked the sale of the country's biggest power network, Ausgrid, to state-owned State Grid Corp of China and Hong Kong-listed Cheung Kong Infrastructure Holdings on security concerns.

COX Powertrain's 300hp Diesel Outboard

(Photo: Cox Powertrain)

Cox Powertrain will preview its professional outboard motor, the CXO300, at the Workboat Show in New Orleans later this year. Britain's Cox brought together engineers from Formula 1 racing and automotive engine design to develop this new concept diesel engine, providing gasoline outboard performance, with diesel economy and reliability. Cox will display a full sized model of the CXO300, which is a revolutionary opposed-piston, diesel outboard designed specifically for professional marine users.

Libyan Oil Port Takeover Gives Edge to Eastern Commander

Less than a fortnight after forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar swept into four of Libya's oil ports, tankers are loading, production has jumped, and momentum has shifted firmly in the divisive former general's favour. For Haftar's opponents, and for Western powers, the move on the ports was alarming. Haftar and his backers in eastern Libya have been in a stand-off for months with a unity government in Tripoli, blocking any parliamentary vote to endorse it and challenging the U.N.-mediated deal to unify Libya. How Haftar and his allies will use control of the country's major oil exports - whether to leverage political advantage under that U.N. deal, or to extend military control across Libya - is still uncertain. But risks to stability are clear.

South Korea: 'Tough Luck' to Hanjin

The South Korean government, long a bastion of support for the country's big conglomerates, is sticking to its hard-line stance on Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd , whose collapse is roiling global supply chains. Since the world's seventh-largest container carrier filed for court receivership in late August, the government has sought to limit the impact on the export-dependent economy and Hanjin customers but is otherwise leaving the company to fend for itself. "It now is entirely up to the court," a government official closely linked to the matter told Reuters, declining to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue. South Korea has said no government or central bank money will be directly injected into firms undergoing restructuring in the ailing shipping and shipbuilding industries.

Petrobras to Seek Builders for Six Platforms

Petroleo Brasileiro SA, Brazil's state-run oil company, as of 2017 will begin seeking offers for the construction of six new offshore oil platforms envisioned in current investment plans, according to a newspaper interview published Sunday. In an interview with O Globo, the biggest daily in the company's home base of Rio de Janeiro, Petrobras' director of exploration and production said the six new platforms, together likely to cost as much as $6 billion, are among eight rigs planned to enter service by 2021, with bidding for the other two contracts already under way. The new platforms, Solange Guedes said, will come on the heels of another 11 platforms already under construction and expected to enter service through 2019.

Second Ship of Franklin Arctic Voyage Found, Canada Confirms

Canada confirmed on Monday it has found the wreck of HMS Terror, the second of two British ships lost in the disastrous Franklin Arctic voyage of 1845, and said the government will work closely with northern aboriginals on ownership of the artifacts. Parks Canada, a federal agency, said in a statement it will work on "joint ownership" of the wreckage from the journey through Canada's Northwest Passage. Britain's Guardian newspaper reported earlier this month that the Arctic Research Foundation, a private group participating in the search effort, had found the ship in pristine condition at the bottom of a bay. Sir John Franklin and his…

S.Korea: Hanjin Cash, Parent Support Should Cover Offloading Fees

A Hanjin Boxship underway (File image: Hanjin)

Cash from top shareholder, executives should cover offload costs. South Korea's government said cash held by Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd and funds pledged by its parent group should meet the costs of unloading some $14 billion in cargo stranded on vessels operated by the troubled container line. The collapse of South Korea's biggest shipping operator late last month has plunged the shipping industry into chaos ahead of the crucial year-end holiday shopping season as dozens of vessels and their crews wait for money needed to pay for port and handling fees.

Finland Funds Autonomous Ship Research

Image: Tekes

The Finnish government's innovation investment arm, Tekes, said that it is making a multi-year commitment to funding collaborative research and development of autonomous, unmanned ships to ply the world’s oceans in the not-so-distant future. Tekes said in a statement that this research area is a priority for the Finnish government and would contribute to the nation's competitiveness. "Digitalization has a strong role in the development of the competitiveness of the Finnish maritime cluster.

U.S. Shale Gas Shipment to Arrives in Britain

The first shipment of gas fracked from U.S. shale will arrive in Britain next week, upping pressure on Scotland to reassess its opposition to fracking. Chemicals giant Ineos will be importing ethane, obtained from rocks fractured at high pressure, in a foretaste of larger deliveries of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from shale set to reach Europe in 2018. The shipment of ethane, used to make plastics, anti-freeze and detergents, will arrive in Scotland's Firth of Forth on Tuesday, accompanied by a lone Scots piper at sunrise, the company said. The Zurich-headquartered group is against a Scottish moratorium on fracking. It is Britain's biggest shale gas company in terms of acreage and it has promised to share six percent of future shale gas revenue with local residents.

Cosco wins Abu Dhabi Container Terminal Concession

Abu Dhabi Ports has awarded China's Cosco Shipping a 35-year concession to build and operate a new container terminal at Khalifa Port, the chief executive of the Abu Dhabi company told Reuters on Wednesday. The terminal is expected to be operational in the first quarter of 2018, Mohamed Juma al-Shamisi said. It will have a capacity of 2.4 million twenty foot equivalent units (TEUs), with an option to increase that to 3.5 million TEUs, Shamisi added. COSCO is expected to invest as much as $400 million on the project. Abu Dhabi Ports is an Abu Dhabi government-owned company that runs Khalifa Port and the Khalifa Industrial Zone.   Reporting by Stanley Carvalho and Maha El Dahan

Toll to Build Two New Ships

Photo:  Toll Holdings Limited

Toll Group announced it is investing $170 million to build two new ships to support trade between Victoria and Tasmania and to meet the demands of continued growth. The new, purpose-built ships, operating between Burnie, Tasmania and Melbourne, Victoria, will provide 40 per cent more freight capacity, more opportunities to transport refrigerated freight for Tasmania’s growing chilled export market and more flexibility for customer deliveries. The new vessels will be available in late 2018 and will replace Toll’s existing ships, continuing to operate overnight services, six days per week.

Shipping to Get Status of infrastructure in India

Photo: Shipping Corporation of India

The Government of India will consider giving shipping the status of Infrastructure in the country and all efforts would be made to improve it’s productivity, says Minister of State for Shipping, Road Transport and Highways, Chemicals & Fertilizers, Mansukh Lal Mandaviya. He was reviewing the activities of Shipping Corporation of India in Mumbai today. The Minister was briefed by the senior officers of the Shipping Corporation of India about the recent business initiatives like formation of Inland Waterways…

More Plastic than Fish in the Ocean

Photo: International Maritime Organization

Did you know that by 2050 there could be more plastics in the ocean than fish, if human habits don’t change? India Clean Seas Conference taking place in Goa, India (22-24 September), discussed what needs to be done to keep the oceans clean. IMO’s Director of Marine Environment, Stefan Micallef delivered the opening address, highlighting daunting environmental challenges facing the oceans and how to develop sustainable solutions. Micallef pointed out how IMO’s marine pollution convention MARPOL has played a key role as a comprehensive…

Boosting Maritime Security in Cameroon

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

An International Maritime Organization (IMO)-led maritime security table top exercise is taking place in Yaoundé, Cameroon (6-8 September) for participants from a range of government departments and national agencies, including the Maritime Authority. The exercise encourages a multi-agency, whole of government approach to maritime security and maritime law enforcement issues. A range of evolving scenarios are being used to stimulate discussions and demonstrate the need for cooperation amongst government departments and agencies.

Australia settles six years after Barrier Reef accident

Australia on Monday reached a A$39.3 million ($29.66 million) out-of-court settlement with the owners of a Chinese coal carrier that ran aground in 2010 on the Great Barrier Reef. The settlement, dismissed by an environmental group as not enough, is less than a third of what the Australian government was seeking from the ship's owner - Shenzhen Energy Transport Co - for remediation costs after the 225-metre long Shen Neng 1 ran aground on the reef's Douglas Shoal. The fully-laden carrier was en route to China when it sailed outside the shipping lane and ran aground on April 3, 2010. Anti-fouling paint that peeled off the ship contained a highly toxic component, tributyltin, that is now banned from use.

Libyan Commander's Seizure of Oil Ports Risks New Conflict

Libyan forces loyal to eastern commander Khalifa Haftar said on Monday they had tightened their control over four major oil ports, casting a Western-backed project to unite Libya and revive oil exports into deep uncertainty. Haftar's forces met little resistance as they seized the terminals at Ras Lanuf, Es Sider, Zueitina and Brega in an operation launched on Sunday, displacing a rival armed faction aligned with the U.N.-backed Government of National Accord (GNA) in Tripoli. The advance is the latest power struggle over the OPEC nation's energy assets, after the 2011 fall of Muammar Gaddafi and the chaos that followed left the North African country splintered into competing rival armed factions.

San Pedro Port Expansion Project Awarded

Ivory Coast has awarded a project to upgrade its second port of San Pedro to global shipping giant Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) and the Bilal Group, a government spokesman said on Wednesday.   Speaking after a cabinet meeting in the commercial capital Abidjan, Bruno Kone said MSC would invest 122 billion CFA francs ($209.14 million) and the Bilal Group 186 billion CFA francs ($318.83 million) under the build-operate-transfer deal.   (Reporting by Loucoumane Coulibaly)

 

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Sep 2016 - Maritime & Ship Security

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