Chet Morrison Develops Subsea Cutter: SHARC

MarineLink.com
Thursday, May 23, 2013
DSV Joanne Morrison (Photo: Chet Morrison Contractors)

Chet Morrison Contractors has developed a subsea cutter that they say offers improvement over existing technologies.

SHARC (Subsea Hydraulic Abrasive Rotating Cutter) was developed to make subsea P&A work safer for divers by eliminating the need for hand jetting and reducing the time divers spend under water performing. In addition, the manufacturer claims that SHARC reduces overall job time by 60 percent and can be deployed by Chet Morrison’s 240-foot, four-point DSV Joanne Morrison, thus avoiding the higher cost of larger spreads.

The prototype for SHARCwas developed during a 2012 four-well Subsea P&A project for Helix ERT in three fields in the Gulf of Mexico. Chet Morrison Contractors then made the decision to further develop and refine the technology for use on other projects. According to Rod Hebert, consultant with Helix ERT, “The Chet Morrison P&A, dive and marine crew did outstanding work. Using this new cutting tool, they completed four wells for us at about half of the expected cost. Chet Morrison saved ERT and partners many millions of dollars.”

Following the project, engineers at Chet Morrison Contractors spent many months testing and refining the prototype to develop the new assembly. SHARC needs only a diver or ROV to position it over the pipe opening—then operations can be controlled and monitored from the surface. SHARC can make clean, even cuts on pipes two inches and larger, handle walls up to three inches thick with multiple strings and can cut any size caisson or jacket leg from surface or subsea to depths up to 500 feet. Not only is SHARC a safer option for divers, it’s also better for the subsea environment. Unlike other methods, it does not require the use of explosives or hand jetting.

Video animation of SHARC available at www.vimeo.com/66180765 or on the Chet Morrison website.

www.chetmorrison.com

 

  • SHARC (Photo: Chet Morrison Contractors)

    SHARC (Photo: Chet Morrison Contractors)

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