GAO Report: U.S. National Security and Military Depend on Jones Act

MarineLink.com
Wednesday, April 03, 2013
Photo: American Maritime Partnership

In a letter to the House Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces Chairman Randy Forbes (R-VA) and Ranking Member Mike McIntyre (D-NC), the American Maritime Partnership (AMP) highlighted a new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on Puerto Rico and American shipping that says U.S. national security and military preparedness heavily depend on the Jones Act.
 
The Jones Act is a U.S. maritime law that mandates the use of vessels that are American-crewed, -built, and -owned to move cargo between two U.S. ports.  “A decline in the number of U.S. flag vessels would result in the loss of jobs that employ skilled mariners needed to crew the U.S. military reserve and other deep-sea vessels in times of emergency,” the GAO said.  “According to DOD officials, to the extent that Jones Act markets are unable to sustain a viable reserve fleet, DOD would have to incur substantial additional costs to maintain and recapitalize a reserve fleet of its own.”  The GAO also said that loss of the Jones Act could result in “significant effects on shipyards and the shipyard industry base needed by DOD.”  
 
The GAO report explained the important role of the American domestic shipping industry for the Department of Defense. In finding that “the original goal of the [Jones] Act remains important to military preparedness,” GAO made three particular points about the American domestic fleet:
 
•A strong domestic fleet is necessary to ensure an available supply of seafarers for times of national crisis.
•The American domestic fleet is a cost-efficient way to provide military sealift.
•A strong national shipyard base is essential to military preparedness, particularly today. 
 
“As you know, DOD and the U.S. Navy heavily rely on commercial mariners, including many from the U.S. domestic fleet, for a variety of critical national security roles,” said AMP.  “DOD has previously estimated that replacing the commercial maritime industry with military vessels would cost billions of dollars.”
 

Maritime Reporter March 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Shipbuilding

ClassNK Approves Fillet Welding Consumable

Classification society ClassNK announced that it has granted type approval for the new MX-200F welding consumable, developed by Kobe Steel Co., Ltd. (KOBELCO) to

Damen Lays Keel for Indonesian Naval Frigate

In accordance with the agreed planning in the contract for the construction of a Damen SIGMA Frigate for the Indonesian Navy, the keel laying ceremony has taken place on April 16,

Offshore Service Vessels Design Innovation

It could be argued that no other sector of the maritime market has experienced a design innovation revolution quite like the Offshore Service Vessel (OSV) market.

Navy

UN Seeks Sanctions Waiver to Ship Arms to Mali

The United Nations is seeking an exemption from a U.N. Security Council arms embargo on Ivory Coast so it can ship weapons and military equipment across the East

US Navy Vessel Heads Home Following Fire

U.S. Fleet Forces announced late Monday that USS Hue City (CG 66) would return to her homeport of Mayport, Fla. on her own power following a fire that occurred April 14.

Pirates Approach Tanker in Bab El Mandeb

The U.S. Navy Maritime Liaison Office in Bahrain (MARLO) has advised that on or about 12:30 UTC on 14 April, the Master of an oil tanker reported being approached by a white-blue skiff in position 12.

Government Update

Obama Offers US Aid to S.Korea Following Ferry Accident

U.S. President Barack Obama on Thursday expressed condolences to the families of the victims of the South Korean ferry sinking and said the U.S. military will provide

S.Korean Ferry Master Faces Investigation

The captain of the South Korean ferry that capsized off the southwest coast was facing a criminal investigation on Thursday, an official said, amid unconfirmed

Divers Struggle in Search for Ferry Survivors

Rescuers struggle with waves, murky waters; Captain faces charge of abandoning South Korean ferry. About 290 people still missing, many of them teenagers. Rescuers

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1193 sec (8 req/sec)