Nautical Chart Updating – White Paper by OceanGrafix

Press Release
Monday, June 04, 2012

The paper highlights why waterways change and how chart updates are made

OceanGrafix, the exclusive provider of NOAA print-on-demand (POD) nautical charts for U.S. waters, announces the availability of “The Creation of Accurate, Precise Charts: Understanding U.S. Nautical Chart Updates and Their Distribution.” This new white paper highlights why nautical charts are so important to mariners—including recreational boaters—and explains how a mariner can easily access chart updates.

“Recreational boaters, unlike commercial mariners, are not required to carry nautical charts. But as more demands are put on our waterways, busy coasts mean more risk for accidents,” says Capt. John Lowell, director of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey. “By using charts that are current, people have a better chance of avoiding potential groundings and other accidents.”

Waterways are never stagnant—changes in depth, missing navigational lights, and new wrecks and obstructions are just some of the obstacles that are constantly changing. Many of these changes can’t be seen by the naked eye. While some argue that these changes are negligible, a 2010 U.S. Coast Guard report found grounding in recreational boating accidents resulted in 11 deaths and $3.3 million in damages.

Maintaining up-to-date electronic and paper charts is an easy way for boaters to stay safe on the water. As the paper points out, charting today is faster and more accurate for mapmakers with the advent of satellites, sonar, LIDAR, and GPS. Plus, boaters can take advantage of electronic chart updates and print-on-demand paper charts that incorporate the latest updates and notices from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard.

The White Paper is available here.



 

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