East China Sea Physical Oceanography Under the Microscope

SeaDiscovery.com
Thursday, September 12, 2013
Team Researchers: Photo courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The joint U.S.-Taiwan program called “Quantifying, Predicting, and Exploiting Uncertainty” (QPE) is using data collected in the field to understand how uncertainty in computer models of the ocean near Taiwan changes in time and space.

The QPE team hopes it will be able to improve the current oceanographic understanding of the East China Sea, and improve methods used to model similar currents around the world.

Just days before a team of researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and National Taiwan University set out to conduct fieldwork in the East China Sea, Typhoon Morakot—one of the most destructive storms ever to hit Taiwan—made landfall on the island, causing widespread damage and drastically altering the flow of water along the nearby continental shelf. The typhoon, which struck in Aug. 2009, caused catastrophic damage in Taiwan, killing several hundred people and dropping up to 2 meters of rain in just 5 days in the mountains.

In their work to understand the strong currents over the continental shelf and slope in the East China Sea, the researchers used four ships for intensive sampling of the continental shelf and slope, and deployed several moorings and conducted high-resolution hydrographic surveys.  But the timing of their research also enabled them to examine the impact of freshwater run-off from Typhoon Morakot on the continental shelf northeast of Taiwan, the upwelling and cooling that occurred over the continental shelf after the Typhoon, and the effect of Typhoon Morakot on the biogeochemistry and nutrient dynamics of the continental shelf.

Although the East China Sea is home to some of the world’s most active fisheries and shipping lanes, the basic oceanography of the area is not yet well understood, says WHOI coastal oceanographer Glen Gawarkiewicz, one of the primary investigators for the program. “It’s a very difficult place to study—the currents in the region are extremely powerful, and are constantly shifting and changing, which makes it tough to predict how the ocean will behave there at any given time,” he notes. As a result, Gawarkiewicz says existing computer models of the area have a large degree of “uncertainty,” or margin of error.

The joint program, called “Quantifying, Predicting, and Exploiting Uncertainty” (QPE), is using data collected in the field to understand how uncertainty in computer models of the ocean near Taiwan changes in time and space. In the process, Gawarkiewicz hopes the QPE team will not only be able to improve the current oceanographic understanding of the East China Sea, but improve methods used to model similar currents around the world. Funding for the program was provided by the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

For more information, please visit www.whoi.edu




 

Maritime Reporter March 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Technology

Colfax's Acquisition of Victor Technologies Complete

ESAB has announced that Colfax Corporation has completed the previously announced acquisition of Victor Technologies Holdings, Inc. Victor is a preeminent global manufacturer of cutting,

Ben3D Introduces ContainerTug 600S

Ben3D BV Naval Architecture introduce in collaboration with Oonincx Shipbuilding BV the innovative ContainerTug 600S. A strong, compact Dutch built workboat with

DNV GL Oil & Gas to Expand in Norway

Relocates Norwegian oil and gas HQ to Stavanger, led by Marianne Hauso; to increase staff in Western Norway by 10% in 2014 DNV GL is relocating its oil and

Marine Science

ONR Researchers Explore a Changing Arctic

As sea ice continues to recede at a record pace in the Arctic, officials at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) on April 14 announced new efforts to determine the

Pioneering Tech for Offshore Wind Farm Maintenance

James Fisher Renewables pioneers trial of innovative Ship-to-Turbine Oil Change System James Fisher Renewables conducted an innovative trial of Ship-to-Turbine (STT),

KONGSBERG to deliver C4I CORTEX for the Combatant Craft Medium Mark One

KONGSBERG will provide the C4I infrastructure solution for the CCM Mk 1 production contract, awarded to Oregon Iron Works,    Inc. (OIW) in Clackamas, OR on February 10th, 2014.

Ocean Observation

ONR Researchers Explore a Changing Arctic

As sea ice continues to recede at a record pace in the Arctic, officials at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) on April 14 announced new efforts to determine the

Severe Cyclone Ita heads towards Queensland

At 3:00pm today EST Severe Tropical Cyclone Ita, Category 5, was about 130km N-NE of Cooktown and 290km N of Cairns, and moving S-SW at 14km per hour.   Severe Tropical Cyclone Ita,

South Pole Telescope Finds Proof of Big Bang

Several recent media reports state that the existence of the Big Bang allegedly has been proven by BICEP, a telescope stationed at the South Pole. In 2011, Mammoet

 
 
Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1929 sec (5 req/sec)