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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Lone Star Tow Operations Underway Near Dillingham, Alaska

October 18, 2013

The mast of the fishing vessel Lone Star juts from the water of the Igushik River near Dillingham, Alaska, as salvage crews work to recover the vessel Sept. 21, 2013. The Lone Star overturned and sank in 18 feet of water June 30. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Daniel Peters)

The mast of the fishing vessel Lone Star juts from the water of the Igushik River near Dillingham, Alaska, as salvage crews work to recover the vessel Sept. 21, 2013. The Lone Star overturned and sank in 18 feet of water June 30. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Daniel Peters)

Salvage crews began tow operations for the fishing vessel Lone Star near Dillingham, Wednesday, the U.S. Coast Guard reported today.

The crew of the tug Double Eagle, with assistance from the crew of the support vessel Western Viking, will tow the Lone Star to Dutch Harbor where its owner will determine whether or not to scrap the vessel.

“The removal of the Lone Star has been a long process, and we appreciate the work and support of the salvage crew and our agency partners throughout the response,” said Lt. Daniel Peters of the Sector Anchorage prevention department. “The Coast Guard’s primary concern was ensuring salvage operations were conducted in a safe manner and removing the threat the Lone Star posed to the environment and vessel traffic in the Igushik River.”

The response to the Lone Star began June 30 when the vessel capsized and partially submerged in 18 feet of water with reportedly 14,000 gallons of diesel, 150 gallons of lube oil, 150 gallons of hydraulic fluid and 250 gallons of gasoline aboard. It was reported a change in tide swung the ship against the anchor chair, detaching the transducer and coolant lines. This created a hole in the steel hull and caused the vessel to take on water.

The Coast Guard, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Department of the Interior and Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation responded to the incident along with Resolve-Magone Marine Services and Alaska Chadux Corporation, contractors hired by the vessel owner to mitigate pollution and remove the vessel from the river.

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