Ulstein Adds ‘X-STERN’ to its Design Portfolio

Posted by Eric Haun
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
An offshore vessel with the X-STERN has increased operability in harsh conditions

Ulstein Group introduced the X-STERN, a design feature increasing vessel operability through positive effects on station keeping, wave response, comfort and safety in harsh conditions.

An X-STERN vessel can stay on position in harsh weather with the stern towards waves, wind and current. For vessels where the best possible motion characteristics are vital, positioning the X-STERN towards the weather instead of the bow will be the captain’s natural choice.

The X-STERN leads to reduced pitch and wave drift forces, as well as eliminating slamming. Positive effects are reduced power and fuel consumption while on DP, or the possibility of operating in a wider sector with the same power consumption.

The X-STERN has several of the same characteristics as the X-BOW, and additional ice operation capabilities. Its gentle displacement reduces acceleration, pitch and heave, it improves comfort and safety, and the operational window is increased. There will be no sea on deck, and reduced ice build-up in cold climates, due to the stern shape and enclosed nature of the aft deck.

“An innovation process is a long process, in which we work strategically in order to come up with safer, smarter and greener solutions,” said Tore Ulstein, deputy CEO and Head of Markets & Innovations in Ulstein.

“We discuss operational challenges with our customers, and work on how to transfer these challenges into technical solutions which can be turned into commercial products. The X-STERN is patent-pending in several countries, including the U.S. and in the EU.”

In 2005, Ulstein Group introduced the X-BOW to the market, a design feature which increases crew comfort while giving the opportunity to keep up speed in foul weather or the option of reduced fuel consumption. Currently, close to 100 X-BOW vessels are being constructed or have been delivered world-wide. The X-STERN takes a new step in increasing vessel operability even more.

ulstein.com
 

  • Example: A PSV with the X-STERN (top), and a PSV with conventional stern

    Example: A PSV with the X-STERN (top), and a PSV with conventional stern

  • Air view: Comparison of conventional stern (grey) vs X-STERN (green)

    Air view: Comparison of conventional stern (grey) vs X-STERN (green)

  • A conventional stern (bottom) has limited operability with stern towards harsh weather, while the X-STERN (top) offers an increased operability in such conditions and results in an improved ‘X-BOW’ effect on seakeeping.

    A conventional stern (bottom) has limited operability with stern towards harsh weather, while the X-STERN (top) offers an increased operability in such conditions and results in an improved ‘X-BOW’ effect on seakeeping.

  • Side view conventional stern (bottom) with stern to weather: sea is reflected and reaches work deck, and side view X-STERN (top): no sea on work deck

    Side view conventional stern (bottom) with stern to weather: sea is reflected and reaches work deck, and side view X-STERN (top): no sea on work deck

  • Side view: Comparison of conventional stern (grey) vs X-STERN (green)

    Side view: Comparison of conventional stern (grey) vs X-STERN (green)

  • Example: A subsea vessel with the X-STERN (top), and a subsea vessel with conventional stern

    Example: A subsea vessel with the X-STERN (top), and a subsea vessel with conventional stern

  • Example: A PSV with the X-STERN (top), and a PSV with conventional stern
  • Air view: Comparison of conventional stern (grey) vs X-STERN (green)
  • A conventional stern (bottom) has limited operability with stern towards harsh weather, while the X-STERN (top) offers an increased operability in such conditions and results in an improved ‘X-BOW’ effect on seakeeping.
  • Side view conventional stern (bottom) with stern to weather: sea is reflected and reaches work deck, and side view X-STERN (top): no sea on work deck
  • Side view: Comparison of conventional stern (grey) vs X-STERN (green)
  • Example: A subsea vessel with the X-STERN (top), and a subsea vessel with conventional stern

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter June 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Shipbuilding

Russian Sub 'Stary Oskol' Enters Black Sea

Russia’s Stary Oskol submarine, the third boat in Project 636.3 series for the Black Sea Fleet, on a voyage to its permanent base has passed the Bosporus and Dardanelles straits,

VLCC Delivered to Gener8 Maritime

Gener8 Maritime, Inc., a U.S.-based provider of international seaborne crude oil transportation services, has taken delivery of the ECO VLCC the Gener8 Constantine on June 27,

Future LCS Charleston’s Keel Authenticated

A ceremony was hosted to celebrate the keel authentication of the U.S. Navy's future USS Charleston (LCS 18), the ninth Independence variant littoral combat ship, June 28.

News

Light at the End of the Tunnel Distant for Multipurpose Shipping

The demand outlook for the multipurpose fleet has not improved since the first quarter of 2016. The breakbulk and project cargo sector remain weak, with little

VLCC Delivered to Gener8 Maritime

Gener8 Maritime, Inc., a U.S.-based provider of international seaborne crude oil transportation services, has taken delivery of the ECO VLCC the Gener8 Constantine on June 27,

COSCO Says Piraeus Port Sale Terms Inconsistent with Deal

COSCO Greece objected on Wednesday to terms submitted to parliament for the sale of Piraeus Port to China COSCO Shipping, saying they were inconsistent with those

Maritime Safety

AWO Authorizes ClassNK to Perform RCP Audits

The American Waterways Operators (AWO) and ClassNK have signed an agreement under which ClassNK will be authorized to conduct audits of AWO's Responsible Carrier Program,

Waterway Reopened after Barge Grounding

The U.S. Coast Guard has opened the Red River from mile marker 40 to mile marker 42 for vessel traffic, Monday.   The Red River had been closed due to a barge that had run aground at mile marker 41,

Lloyd's Register Extends Drilling Rig Integrity Support

Exploration begins by BHP Billiton using the Deepwater Invictus rig and supported by Lloyd’s Register’s rig integrity team. Lloyd’s Register (LR) announced it

Dynamic Positioning

Lloyd's Register Extends Drilling Rig Integrity Support

Exploration begins by BHP Billiton using the Deepwater Invictus rig and supported by Lloyd’s Register’s rig integrity team. Lloyd’s Register (LR) announced it

SPS Used for Pipe-Layer Upgrade

The 127,500dwt Solitaire has completed some of the most challenging projects in which heavy pipe has been laid in very deep waters.   Originally built in Japan as a mini-Capesize bulk carrier,

BigLift Shipping Expands Heavy Lift Fleet

BigLift Shipping said it has ordered a third Happy S-type vessel. The new build vessel, to be named Happy Sun, will be identical to BigLift’s Happy Star and will

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1370 sec (7 req/sec)