General Dynamics Introduce Airborne Acoustic Processing System

SeaDiscovery.com
Monday, May 13, 2013

General Dynamics Canada says more powerful, reliable and accurate detection of underwater threats is now possible with the introduction of its newest airborne acoustic processing systems. Venom, the UYS-505 system, is the latest addition to General Dynamics’ family of acoustic processing offerings.

It leverages commercial-level advances in hardware and the latest innovations in signal processing technologies to maximize the detection of submerged threats in deep and coastal waters. Venom is built specifically for fixed and rotary-wing applications and engineered to improve tactical awareness, reduce operator workload and alleviate size, weight and power concerns in the cramped cabins of modern military aircraft.

“Airborne acoustic processing has become more complex. Additionally, many of the legacy solutions that are still used on fixed and rotary-wing aircraft were designed 15 to 20 years ago and lag current technology,” said David Ibbetson, general manager, General Dynamics Canada. “The new Venom system processes and presents large volumes of information in an easily accessible and digestible manner. It allows operators to find a target quickly and hold onto it for as long as necessary. Plus it is considerably smaller and lighter than current systems, which eliminates the need for large, bulky processors and their accompanying hardware and harnesses.”

The Venom system is engineered for passive and active signal processing operations. It can process signals from up to 64 deployed sonobuoys, and features embedded control for dipping sonar systems. It also includes General Dynamics Canada’s Computerized Underwater Detection Assistant (CUDA), an application designed to automatically assess the tactical picture in noisy littoral regions without operator intervention.

The Venom processor is based on more than 40 years of knowledge and experience General Dynamics Canada has acquired developing advanced acoustic processing systems for military organizations worldwide. The advanced features, functions and capabilities of this new system have already led to its selection for duty on fixed- and rotary-wing maritime patrol aircraft in the Pacific Rim.

www.gdcanada.com

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