Quantifying Arctic shipping risk through case studies

Posted by Joseph R. Fonseca
Friday, April 11, 2014

 Shipping activities in Arctic areas are certain to increase in the years to come and, as the Arctic is a challenging and 

 
diverse environment, knowing how to manage its risks will be crucial. Through case studies, DNV GL has estimated that the 
 
risk is nearly 30 per cent higher for a cruise ship and almost 15 per cent higher for a bulk carrier compared to more 
 
conventional routes.
 
“We needed to gain a deeper understanding of the risk in the different parts of the Arctic in order to make better decisions 
 
about future developments,” said Knut Ørbeck-Nilssen, President DNV GL Maritime. “We had to put guesswork aside and apply a 
 
scientific approach to clarify risk levels in the Arctic. In doing so, we employed typical DNV GL methods: we identified the 
 
risks and then proposed recommendations to mitigate probabilities and consequences.”
 
To understand the shipping risks, DNV GL examined the case of a cruise ship sailing off the coast of Greenland and a bulk 
 
carrier transiting the Northern Sea Route. The study showed that, in the cruise ship scenario, the overall risk is nearly 30 
 
per cent higher than elsewhere, largely due to the survival challenges faced by the people on board. The risk to the bulk 
 
carrier was almost 15 per cent higher because of the danger of collision with ice.
 
A report recently released by DNV GL, THE ARCTIC – the next risk frontier, proposes a number of design concepts to reduce 
 
risk. For cruise ships, enhanced damage stability, a collision-resistant hull and lifeboats better suited to the Arctic are 
 
all measures aimed at improving survivability in the case of an accident. For bulk carriers, hovercraft lifeboats enabling 
 
mobility over both water and ice and checks on the ice strengthening to ensure that it matches the actual ice conditions are 
 
important measures to manage the risks.
 
“Research into new technologies is critical, as is the need for greater cooperation and regional planning,” says Mr Ørbeck-
 
Nilssen. “The decision to progress with industrial activity in the Arctic will involve a ‘social licence to operate’ from the 
 
local communities and society at large. DNV GL will work together with the maritime industry and authorities to make the 
 
activity as safe and environmentally friendly as possible.”
 
DNV GL’s research indicates that it is advisable to adopt a stepwise approach which sees the least challenging locations 
 
developed before the harshest ones. This way, the technology and infrastructure have time to develop and risks can be kept at 
 
a level comparable to those in other parts of the world.
 
DNV GL 
Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Cruise Ship Trends

Port of Houston Expecting Record Year

The Port of Houston Authority is expecting 2014 to close as a banner year for the port, with 34 million tons of cargo handled through November, Executive Director

Duffy Named President of Carnival Cruise

Carnival Corporation & plc., the world’s largest travel and leisure company, today announced that Christine Duffy has been named president of Carnival Cruise Line,

Fincantieri Wins Carnival Cruise Ship Order

Fincantieri SpA has been awarded an order by Carnival Corporation & plc for the construction of two new cruise ships for Carnival Cruise Line and Holland America Line.

Navigation

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

The Economic Impact of Inland Waterway Investment

A recently released study entitled INLAND NAVIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES evaluates the economic impacts and the potential effects of infrastructure investment on our economy.

Transas Installs ECDIS Simulators at Romanian University

Romanian university Constanța Maritime University will provide ECDIS training in accordance with the STCW 2010 requirements    Transas Marine has installed the

Environmental

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

Costa Rica Approves APM Terminals Project

Port operator APM Terminals, a unit of Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk, said on Friday Costa Rica's environment agency had approved the construction of its Moin Container Terminal project.

NOAA: US to See More Floods from Sea Level Rise

Most of U.S. coast may see 30 or more days a year of floods up to 2 feet above high tides. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened

Casualties

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

Report: Dire Conditions in Indian Shipbreaking Yards

Report by Indian research institute reveals poor enforcement of occupational health and safety provisions   The working and living conditions at the shipbreaking yards of Alang,

Wrecked Bulker’s Bow Refloated, Scuttled off S.Africa

TITAN Salvage, Crowley Maritime Corp.'s Houston-based marine salvage, emergency response and wreck removal company, has refloated and scuttled the largest section of the wrecked bulk carrier, Smart.

Maritime Safety

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

DNV GL Targets Safer Approach to Subsea Lifting

The completion of a joint industry project (JIP) to improve existing standards and regulations around subsea lifting operations has resulted in a new recommended practice (RP).

NOAA: US to See More Floods from Sea Level Rise

Most of U.S. coast may see 30 or more days a year of floods up to 2 feet above high tides. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened

Vessels

Damen Outfitting First of Nine Bahamas Patrol Boats

The first of nine Damen Stan Patrol 3007s ordered by the Royal Bahamas Defense Force has arrived at Damen Shipyards Gorinchem in the Netherlands for outfitting.

MARAD Publishes US ATB, ITB Database

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) released what it is calling a first-of-its-kind public database that chronicles U.S.-flagged, privately owned domestic

New Chinese Shipyard Launches First Ship

The new shipyard facility of Honghua Offshore Oil & Gas Equipment Company in Jiangsu, China, has launched its first ship, an IMT982 Platform Supply Vessel. The vessel,

Arctic Operations

Reports on Rosneft Arctic Projects

On December 18, Member of Rosneft Board of Directors, special representative of President of the Russian Federation on international cooperation in the Arctic

BSEE Attends Arctic Council Meeting

The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement’s (BSEE) David M. Moore recently traveled to Seattle, Wash., for a meeting of the Arctic Council Emergency Prevention,

RV Sikuliaq: Modern Electric Propulsion & Power Management

While ships have used electricity to help power vessels for a long time, new and sophisticated diesel-electric technologies are making serious gains in efficiency,

 
 
Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0981 sec (10 req/sec)