Underwater Bow Thruster Removal and Reinstallation

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Four months after Hydrex diver/technicians removed the bow thruster of a 280-meter container vessel in Singapore, a Hydrex team once again mobilized to this location to reinstall the overhauled unit underwater with the use of the Hydrex flexible mobdock.

The superintendent of the ship was very satisfied with the first part of the operation. He said that “...the job was completed well within the timeframe of forty hours thanks to good team work of the Hydrex divers, the ship staff and the floating crane operator.” For this reason the customer asked Hydrex to take care of the reinstallation as well, which was carried out last month while the vessel was at anchorage in Singapore.

After setting up a monitoring station on a workboat next to the vessel, the team lowered the bow thruster in the water and maneuvered it inside the thruster tunnel. The team then used the lightweight flexible mobdocks developed by Hydrex to close off the thruster tunnel on both sides. This allowed the diver/technicians to evacuate all the water from the tunnel and create a dry working environment around the bow thruster.

The team then reconnected the unit to the thruster room. Next they secured the unit and installed the blades. Time constraints had prevented the reinstallation of the feedback chain which is necessary to communicate the pitch of the thruster blades to the crew. The diver/technicians reconnected this chain after they had fully secured the unit. After carrying out final testing, the team removed the mobdocks and flooded the thruster tunnel again, thus concluding the operations swiftly and successfully.
 

Source: Hydrex

Maritime Reporter February 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Container Ships

Lomar Adds Seven Container Ships to its Fleet

Lomar Corporation, a Libra Group company, has again added to its fleet of container ships with the purchase of three vessels plus an order for up to four new buildings from the Yangzijiang Shipyard,

25,000-TEU Ships Possible, Not Practical

Maersk Line CEO Soren Skou said ships with capacities of 25,000 twenty-foot-equivalent units are possible but not practical today, and that he expects 18,000-19,

'K' Line to Shrink Container Fleet

Japan's third-biggest shipping company Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha ('K' Line) plans to beef up its LNG and bulker vessels over the next four years, while downsizing its container shipping fleet.

Vessels

Lomar Adds Seven Container Ships to its Fleet

Lomar Corporation, a Libra Group company, has again added to its fleet of container ships with the purchase of three vessels plus an order for up to four new buildings from the Yangzijiang Shipyard,

25,000-TEU Ships Possible, Not Practical

Maersk Line CEO Soren Skou said ships with capacities of 25,000 twenty-foot-equivalent units are possible but not practical today, and that he expects 18,000-19,

'K' Line to Shrink Container Fleet

Japan's third-biggest shipping company Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha ('K' Line) plans to beef up its LNG and bulker vessels over the next four years, while downsizing its container shipping fleet.

 
 
Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1595 sec (6 req/sec)